Edge

Book review: “Life Is What You Make It” by Peter Buffett

Courtesy Two Sheps That Pass

Self-help books can range from the incredibly insightful “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus” by John Gray, to the ridiculously-titled “How to Avoid Huge Ships” by Captain John W. Trimmer. However, Peter Buffett’s “Life Is What You Make It,” although classified as such, is not a self-help book in the normal sense.  There are no easy steps to self-fulfillment, and no full-proof method to financial success. And yet somehow the book attempts to leads you on a journey of self-discovery using basic words of wisdom.

Peter Buffett, an award-winning composer and musician and son of billionaire investor Warren Buffet, shares his thoughts on how to truly be successful. He delivers a book that asks the question: “Which will you choose: the path of least resistance or the path of potentially greatest satisfaction?”

Despite hailing from what most would expect to be a privileged background, Peter Buffett denies that money has had any lasting effect on his life and credits his success to the lessons handed down by his parents. While this idea is sweet, the reader may have a hard time believing that his upbringing had no merit whatsoever on his success.  Unlike many 19 year olds he received a $90,000 nest egg when he came of age. Yet Buffett’s stance is that personal work ethic is all it took.

Though the advice is relatively cliché, he still offers a fresh perspective as the son to a multi-billionaire. The thoughts he lays out reflect the questions so many college students are struggling with now: What do I do with my life? How do I get there if my parents (who may be paying for college) disagree?

Buffet challenges the reader to take control of his or her own life, and “forge your own path.” Basically, decide what makes you happy and do it, even if it entails living out of your car, and eating noodles every night for dinner.

“Life Is What You Make It” may not offer any groundbreaking advice, but if nothing else, Buffet’s book will leave you questioning your future, and at least nudge you in the direction of the common phrase: follow your heart.

Kelly Burns may be contacted at kburns@themiamihurricane.com.

October 19, 2010

Reporters

Kelly Burns

Contributing News Writer


ONE COMMENT ON THIS POST To “Book review: “Life Is What You Make It” by Peter Buffett”

Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Shakey Rodriguez, the Miami high school basketball coaching legend, vividly remembers the first time ...

It was a good day for the Miami Hurricanes basketball team. They moved up to No. 6 in the AP Top 25 ...

Erykah Davenport and Shaneese Bailey made key plays back-to-back late in the game and four players s ...

1. MARLINS: Jeter's Fish trade Gordon. Stanton next?: While others spend -- like the Angels to ...

Five years and two days after being fired as FIU’s football coach, at least one report declares form ...

William W. Sandler Jr. Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Education earns national recognition for it ...

Retired baseball star Alex Rodriguez gives "Major League" advice to UM’s fall graduating c ...

Becoming the Man of the Hour ...

Always a little bit of a flair for the dramatic. ...

A scholarship created by retired Major League Baseball star Alex Rodriguez and born out of his love ...

The University of Miami women's basketball team capped its seven-game homestand with a 79-31 wi ...

University of Miami senior wide receiver Braxton Berrios earned 2017 first-team 2017 CoSIDA Academic ...

The Hurricanes and Colonials square off at noon Saturday in Washington, D.C. ...

University of Miami men's basketball player Chris Stowell is an active member in the Hurricanes ...

Eighteen Hurricane student-athletes graduated from four schools and colleges at the University of Mi ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.