Edge

Book review: “Life Is What You Make It” by Peter Buffett

Courtesy Two Sheps That Pass

Self-help books can range from the incredibly insightful “Men are from Mars, Women are from Venus” by John Gray, to the ridiculously-titled “How to Avoid Huge Ships” by Captain John W. Trimmer. However, Peter Buffett’s “Life Is What You Make It,” although classified as such, is not a self-help book in the normal sense.  There are no easy steps to self-fulfillment, and no full-proof method to financial success. And yet somehow the book attempts to leads you on a journey of self-discovery using basic words of wisdom.

Peter Buffett, an award-winning composer and musician and son of billionaire investor Warren Buffet, shares his thoughts on how to truly be successful. He delivers a book that asks the question: “Which will you choose: the path of least resistance or the path of potentially greatest satisfaction?”

Despite hailing from what most would expect to be a privileged background, Peter Buffett denies that money has had any lasting effect on his life and credits his success to the lessons handed down by his parents. While this idea is sweet, the reader may have a hard time believing that his upbringing had no merit whatsoever on his success.  Unlike many 19 year olds he received a $90,000 nest egg when he came of age. Yet Buffett’s stance is that personal work ethic is all it took.

Though the advice is relatively cliché, he still offers a fresh perspective as the son to a multi-billionaire. The thoughts he lays out reflect the questions so many college students are struggling with now: What do I do with my life? How do I get there if my parents (who may be paying for college) disagree?

Buffet challenges the reader to take control of his or her own life, and “forge your own path.” Basically, decide what makes you happy and do it, even if it entails living out of your car, and eating noodles every night for dinner.

“Life Is What You Make It” may not offer any groundbreaking advice, but if nothing else, Buffet’s book will leave you questioning your future, and at least nudge you in the direction of the common phrase: follow your heart.

Kelly Burns may be contacted at kburns@themiamihurricane.com.

October 19, 2010

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Kelly Burns

Contributing News Writer


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