News

University cutbacks won’t affect Ibis Ride

Despite the wide range of actions being taken by the University of Miami to cope with the struggling economy, the beloved Ibis Ride is in no immediate danger of facing frequency shortages.

“University cutbacks have not impacted the Ibis Ride to date,” said Nanette Vega, the assistant dean of students.  “The Ibis Ride is funded mostly by private donors.”

In spite of what President Donna E. Shalala called “significantly worsened” economic conditions in a message sent to all members of the university community on Feb. 10, the Ibis Ride will not face any abrupt cutbacks and is more popular than ever among the student body.

According to Dean Vega, the amount of students who use the Ibis Ride increases by 1,500 to 3,000 students each year.  Last semester alone, 14,000 students took advantage of university-provided transportation to the Grove. The busiest night for the Ibis Ride was Thursday, on which approximately 500 students rode the bus, compared to the weekend when approximately 800 to 1,000 students used the bus.

With the increase in ridership has also come a significant decrease in violations reported of students on board the Ibis Ride.

“Ridership is way up and consequently the frequency of violations is lower,” Ricardo Hall, dean of students, said. “After awareness of the problems we were having went up, there was a sharp improvement in behavior. We are in a different place now.”

Despite the overall improvement in student behavior, the Dean of Students office still plans to monitor the manners and conduct of those using the Ibis Ride, looking to ensure those working on the bus are treated with the utmost respect.

“It irks me that some people are still disrespectful,” Hall said. “It’s more a nuisance than over-the-top bad behavior, but getting sick on the bus or disrespecting the driver or the monitor is completely contrary to why the Ibis Ride is there.”

February 23, 2009

Reporters

Mike Pindelski

Contributing News Writer


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

In 2016, the Miami Hurricanes had tight end David Njoku, who went in the first round of the 2017 NFL ...

Four days had passed since his University of Miami basketball team squandered a 13-point second half ...

The Miami Hurricanes’ search for offensive line help is set to continue on the weekend of Jan. 26, w ...

It looks like Chad Thomas will have another opportunity to show NFL scouts that he is ready to play ...

Hurricanes fans, get out your pencils, calendars and a list of your favorite hotels. The Atlantic Co ...

Presidents at three higher education institutions in Miami "lend our unified voices” to the cal ...

Global and local efforts needed to respond to biological threats, UM President Julio Frenk warned at ...

As artificial Intelligence takes hold, tech visionary David Kenny stresses keeping human values in t ...

UM’s First Black Graduates Project committee visits an iconic D.C. museum for inspiration to create ...

The Beaux Arts Festival of Art debuts at a new site with picture-perfect weather and a panoply of or ...

The University of Miami men's tennis team (1-1) opened the spring portion of its 2017-18 schedu ...

The Miami women's basketball resumes play Sunday at 1 p.m., at Boston College with its northern ...

The University of Miami track and field team starred in the Lone Star State, as the Hurricanes shone ...

The Miami women's tennis team dominated play on its home court Friday to open the 2018 spring s ...

Hurricanes and Wolfpack face off at noon Sunday in Raleigh, N.C. ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.