Wynwood Gallery’s grand reopening features work of UM Fine Arts masters students

On Sept. 4, the University of Miami (UM) successfully launched the grand reopening of their Wynwood Gallery to the general public. The highly competitive Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree provides the professional skills to debut in the studio art scene and earn the qualifications for careers in art departments at the college educational level.

The exhibition features a collective display of the talents and craftsmanship of four unique artists as they enter the 60-credit, three-year program.

Also viewable in an online format, the open gallery is curated in a minimalist style to draw attention to the contents of the creators. Primarily, the overarching color theme seems to settle in black and white, which is shown across multiple mediums including photography, ceramics and printmaking.

Mariana Espindola (photography), Bound, 2021, series, digital photography
Mariana Espindola Photo credit: Mariana Espindola
Mariana Espindola (photography), Bound, 2021, series, digital photography
Mariana Espindola (photography), Bound, 2021, series, digital photography Photo credit: Mariana Espindola
Mariana Espindola (photography), Bound, 2021, series, digital photography
Mariana Espindola (photography), Bound, 2021, series, digital photography Photo credit: Mariana Espindola

Student Mariana Espindola is from Brasilia, Brazil and her series titled Bound is a collection of six photographs taken through a digital camera.

Each photograph showcases close-ups of a central subject who struggles in their interaction with a form of material that binds their face. These materials include many everyday forms of human biproduct such as plastic wrap, zip ties, saran wrap and soda can tabs. The collection seems to hint that our use of plastic has created a toxic relationship within the battle to control our environment.

Alyssa Wood
Alyssa Wood Photo credit: Alyssa Wood
Alyssa Wood (photography), Dysmorphic, 2020, carbon pigment print, 24x27
Alyssa Wood (photography), Dysmorphic, 2020, carbon pigment print, 24x27 Photo credit: Alyssa Wood
Alyssa Wood (photography), Faces, 2020, carbon pigment print, 24x27
Alyssa Wood (photography), Faces, 2020, carbon pigment print, 24x27 Photo credit: Alyssa Wood

Another featured photographer is Alyssa Wood, from Nashville. Her photographs are carbon pigment printed and each have solo titles: Dysmorphic, Elastic, Free?, Faces, Skin, Untitled. The sensual and kaleidoscopic images emphasise movement and body shape. Each work contains questions of identity and resonate a metamorphic quality which recalls elements of surrealism and cubism.

Sepideh Kalani
Sepideh Kalani Photo credit: Sepideh Kalani
Sepideh Kalani (ceramics), Forty + one forbidden, 2020, ceramic and saggar
Sepideh Kalani (ceramics), Forty + one forbidden, 2020, ceramic and saggar Photo credit: Sepideh Kalani
Sepideh Kalani (ceramics), Donkey Eyes, 2020, ceramic and saggar
Sepideh Kalani (ceramics), Donkey Eyes, 2020, ceramic and saggar Photo credit: Sepideh Kalani

Meanwhile, Sepideh Kalani of Tehran, Iran, expresses her point of view in ceramics with clay, saggar and glaze. The sculptural pieces cross the lines between human and animal.

Donkey Eyes showcases a standing morphed human face and yet the title disrupts its essence of humanity by suggesting a relation to the overused animal. Her other works feature robust and evocative forms in statement creations such as Cow’s Heart and I am still Alive, the latter which displays bold bullet form like holes within an organ structure.

Catherine Kramer
Catherine Kramer Photo credit: Catherine Kramer
Catherine Kramer (printmaking), Birds of Paradise, 2021, lithography, 11"x14"
Catherine Kramer (printmaking), Birds of Paradise, 2021, lithography, 11"x14"
Catherine Kramer (printmaking), All Eyes on Me, 2021, lithography, 11"x14"
Catherine Kramer (printmaking), All Eyes on Me, 2021, lithography, 11"x14" Photo credit: Catherine Kramer

Last but certainly not least, Catherine Kramer ties her intricate printmaking to the subject of ropes. The New Orleans native’s works unify through the subjects of a pulled well, an elevator, suspended bird cages and hung washes. She plays with shadows and light in lithography and intaglio.

Through Sept. 23, enjoy the versatile works of the incoming UM MFA students. Gallery hours are Wednesday, Thursday and Friday 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. and hours are subject to change. Please confirm times by call at (305)284-3161.

Learn more at @umartgalleries.

Featured image courtesy of UM College of Arts and Sciences website for Art & Art History.