Canes Covering Coronavirus, Florida, Vero Beach

One-way walking policy seems weird on the boardwalk

Emmalyse Brownstein
Vero Beach, Florida
7:45 p.m. Sunday, April 12

One-way walking policy seems weird on the boardwalk

Walking is something my family has always enjoyed when we’re together, especially because we live very close to the beach. I think many other families have recently been doing the same because, well, it’s really the only thing to do to get out of the house. And these days, going out for a walk or jog is usually the only time I see the light of day. So after a heavy Easter dinner, my mom, sister and I did just that.

We took our usual path eastward through our residential streets and toward the boardwalk. About a 10-minute walk from my house, the boardwalk is a mile-long, elevated walkway made of wood right above the beach dunes.

Painted arrows and one-way signs led my mom, sister and I to use the adjacent sidewalk after walking on the boardwalk to ensure safe social distance from other walkers on Easter.

It’s a popular place for Vero Beach residents to take a stroll, enjoy the sunshine and get a view of the ocean without getting sandy. With everyone cooped up inside, it’s probably an even more popular place right now. So much so that the city had to take precautions in the face of COVID-19.

When we approached the boardwalk, we noticed painted arrows on the wood, indicating a one-way walking policy. The arrows were pointing north, and once we reached the end of the boardwalk, the arrows pointed for us to cross the street and walk back the other way using the sidewalk. The boardwalk width is probably just short of 6 feet, so I think the new rule is appropriate and a good idea. But that doesn’t make it less strange.

This is a place I’ve always come to exercise, hang out with friends and just clear my head. It’s sobering to see how the most every day, seemingly insignificant things are changing or being affected by the pandemic.


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April 19, 2020

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