Opinion

The NFL supports hatred toward America by kneeling during anthem

Watching NFL games on Sunday evenings in the living room is a relaxing way to mentally prepare for the work week. Football is a way to decompress and forget about our troubles. However, what we’ve seen recently is the NFL perpetuating a narrative that loving America is bad, especially with Trump as president.

The players and owners of the NFL decided to alienate patriotic Americans by supporting those who disrespect the national anthem to protest the country’s racial divides. Athletes, such as Colin Kaepernick, believe kneeling during the anthem is a way to show resistance toward a country that “oppresses black people.”

Players have the right to protest racism but should understand that doing so during the anthem will cause many viewers to turn off their televisions.

The NFL has fallen into the trap of blaming Trump instead of the corrupt government that fuels the organization. Instead of advocating for real change, players and owners are defying fans by not participating in one of the core traditions during sporting events.

Kneeling during the national anthem disregards the military and every other patriot in this great country. Soldiers who fought for our country are being disrespected by athletes who protest during our anthem that represents Americans’ great sacrifices and bravery in the name of freedom and democracy.

I do not think that anybody outside of the entertainment and sports industries would protest in this way, other than liberal activists.

If I can’t sing a song or fly the stars and stripes without being called a racist, what kind of society is this? One where people who can’t stand Trump kneel during the anthem to disrupt society? If this behavior continues, our country will be destroyed, decimated from the inside out by hate.

Ronald Reagan once called America “the shining city on a hill,” and we must make sure that light never goes out. With Donald Trump and others fighting for our future, that light is not going out but getting stronger, no matter what the media or NFL want you to think.

Joseph Krupar is a sophomore majoring in political science. Read Ryan Steinberg’s opposing view here.

Featured photo courtesy Flickr user thatedeguy

October 2, 2017

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Joseph Krupar


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