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Wynwood’s monthly gathering, Turnip the Beet, promotes sustainable living practices

During this Saturday's Turnip the Beet festival in Wynwood, vendors showcase their sustainable foods and products. The festival takes place every third Saturday of the month. Madelyn Paquette // Contributing Photographer

During this Saturday’s Turnip the Beet festival in Wynwood, vendors showcase their sustainable foods and products. The festival takes place every third Saturday of the month. Madelyn Paquette // Contributing Photographer

Although Wynwood is best known for its Art Walk every second Saturday night, there’s a new festival that has quietly sprung up in Miami’s haven for all things hip.

Instead of the loud music, outrageous food trucks and avant-garde exhibits of Art Walk, this celebration is all about returning to simplicity and sustainability. The budding monthly gathering, whimsically dubbed Turnip the Beet, occurs every third Saturday of the month.

Held a bit off the beaten path, Turnip the Beet is housed at Colony1’s lot, a short walk from the main Wynwood strip. The event schedule features community gardening, meditation sessions and yoga practice. For those looking to avoid breaking a sweat, there are also group discussions on such topics as peace and metaphysics and workshops on various organic creations.

The festival, which provides a refreshing opportunity to get back to basics, is produced by Colony1, an emerging Miami organization that aims to promote sustainable living practices. The project is sponsored by the non-profit Art of Cultural Evolution, which is working to build an eco-friendly art and environmental research complex on grant land from Miami-Dade County. In the meantime, Colony1 is organizing smaller scale events like Turnip the Beet to promote collaboration between the arts and sciences, as well as conservation.

Turnip the Beet also hosts a variety of vendors, with a focus on homemade and natural products. Visitors can sample star fruit jam, smell organic sugar scrubs and peruse hand-woven purses, among other options. Many of these sellers also contribute raffle prizes to raise money for Colony1’s future projects.

College life can be fast-paced and stressful at even the best of times. If you’re looking for a chance to catch your breath, Turnip the Beet is an unconventional respite from pressures of our non-stop, plugged-in culture.

If you go:

What: Turnip the Beet

Where: Colony1, 550 Perimeter Road (22nd St.), Miami, Fla., 33127

When: Every third Saturday from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m. 

Cost: Free

For more information, visit artofculturalevolution.org or www.facebook.com/Colony1Miami

September 20, 2015

Reporters

Madelyn Paquette


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