Blogs, Miami Globe Trotter

Miami Globe Trotter: Namib Desert is anything but empty

sunset sands

The Namib Desert at sunset // Jamie Servidio

Think of the desert.

For me, I typically imagine dry, barren and dead masses of land with maybe a few camels roaming around. Essentially, I pictured a lifeless landscape – far from what I would consider a travel destination.

Naturally, I assumed this is what I would experience while camping in the Namib Desert, but when I arrived in Sossusvlei after a five-hour drive from Walvis Bay, my assumptions of the desert were completely shattered.

Desert canyon

Photo by Jamie Servidio

After sleeping a night under a seemingly endless sky of stars, I woke up to hike Dune 45 for sunrise. As I made my way up the giant dune, I learned that A) sand dunes are extremely difficult to climb and B) the desert is anything but empty.

I had soft, red sand under my feet, the setting moon to my right, the rising sun to my left, and a deep blue sky above me. The most breathtaking scenery I’ve ever experienced dispelled every preconceived notion I had made about the desert.

The next few days I spent hiking massive dunes and watching the sun rise and set over the desert sands.

I also explored Deadvlei, which is a clay pan that once held shallow pools of water that allowed acacia trees to grow. Drought eventually struck the area, causing the trees to die.

However, the trees have not decomposed due to the dry climate and the desert sun, which has scorched the estimated 900-year-old trees black.

I figured the best way to relay the desert I saw, while traveling with Semester at Sea, would be through pictures. Trust me – it looks better in real life!

All photos were taken by yours truly.

Deadvlei 1 Deadvlei 2tents gabriel tropic of capricorn dune 45 moon set on dune 45

April 29, 2015

Reporters

Jamie Servidio


Around the Web
  • Error
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

RSS Error: WP HTTP Error: fsocket timed out

A University of Miami College of Engineering researcher is trying to perfect a technique of using lu ...

Through an internship with M. Shanken Communications, rising senior Teddy Willson has contributed to ...

University of Miami alumna Vanessa Garcia recounts her personal journey writing for the highly accla ...

University of Miami religious studies professor Catherine Newell weighs in on some of the big questi ...

NASA wants to return humans to the moon by 2024. A University of Miami engineering graduate is part ...

Two Miami Hurricanes were among those players selected to the preseason watch list for the 25th annu ...

ESPN Events announced Thursday afternoon the bracket for the 2019 Charleston Classic, set to take pl ...

The Atlantic Coast Conference announced Tuesday its 2018-19 academic honor roll and 177 University o ...

The ACC Network is set to launch August 22. If your television provider hasn't yet decided to c ...

Claudia De Antonio, Renate Grimstad and Kristyna Frydlova were each selected as WGCA All-American Sc ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.