Edge, Music, Reviews

‘Aranjuez’ enchants listeners through musical journey

Photo Courtesy milosguitar.com

Milos Karadaglic // Photo Courtesy milosguitar.com

Guitarist Miloš Karadaglić displays how musicians don’t need words to tell stories in his CD Aranjuez. Karadaglić takes on the works of Spanish composers Joaquín Rodrigo and Manuel de Falla to create a unique musical experience.

According to Karadaglić’s website, his goal was to bring listeners “on a journey across the Spanish landscape.” The 31-year-old teamed up with the London Philharmonic Orchestra and conductor Yannick Nézet-Séguin for several of the tracks to make that goal a reality.

The album is divided into three parts. The first three tracks are Rodrigo’s Concierto de Aranjuez, for which the album is named. The first track of the concerto, “Allegro con Spirito,” starts out with simple guitar. The riffs grow faster and faster until the sweet sounds of the London Philharmonic join in.

The next track, “Adagio,” sounds more like a wistful love song, the dark slow sound evoking a sweet melancholy. It is followed by “Allegro Gentile,” which has a lighter, more folksy feel.

Then the CD moves into its second section. Tracks four and five are the works of de Falla. These two tracks, along with the first track in the third section feature only Karadaglić and are some of the most memorable, with the guitar playing alone.

The fourth track, “Homenaje pour le Tombeau de Claude Debussy,” stands out in particular with its dark, suspenseful air that elicits images of dancers performing a slow tango.

The final section of the album focuses on two more works by Rodrigo. The first is “Invocacion Y Danza,” which Karadaglić performs alone.

The second, which spans the final four tracks of the CD, is a concerto titled “Fantasia Para Un Gentilhombre.” There is a sweeping, dreamlike quality as the first part of the concerto begins. The sound is reminiscent of the soundtrack for an old movie, the large presence of the London Philharmonic adding to the cinematic quality.

The second part of the concerto continues on with the dreamlike essence, growing darker and a little more introspective, with the slow sound of the guitar backed by soft strings. The third part gets more upbeat, giving the feel of a waltz.

Aranjuez truly takes listeners on a journey. There is a feeling of motion in each track and listeners will be enchanted by the variety of sounds. Even those who are new to classical music will be lost in the notes, almost forgetting there are no lyrics as they are swept away by the stories the instruments tell.

The Cleveland Orchestra will be performing Rodrigo’s Concerto de Aranjuez at 8 p.m. on Nov. 14 in the Adrienne Arsht Center.

November 14, 2014

Reporters

Marlee Lisker


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