Community, Edge, Music

Rock musician bridges gap between generations

Photo Courtesy jackwhiteiii.com.

Photo Courtesy jackwhiteiii.com.

Last Monday, the Miami Beach Fillmore was lit Lazaretto blue. As the curtains peeled back, a short-haired figure stood center stage. “Is that him?” whispered the fan beside me. We were thinking the same thing – where was the black-bobbed rock god we came to see? Then the figure played a familiar riff, and the band erupted into the White Stripes’ “Dead Leaves and the Dirty Ground.” The figure was, indeed, Jack White.

The crowd was a motley crew of Raconteurs fans, forty-somethings from the early White Stripes years and a few younger followers of Jack’s solo work. The show’s culmination of head-banging “Steady As She Goes,” blues-rock “Just One Drink,” and soft, acoustic “Blunderbuss” kept the unlikely mix roaring in unison throughout the two-hour set. Fiddle meshed with face-melting guitar in the tour’s live debut of “Lazaretto,” Jack White’s second studio album, as a tribute to both his Detroit roots and current Nashville residence. The show was a vibrant balance of 90’s nostalgia and riveting new music.

Throughout this performance which seemed to have everything, something was noticeably missing: cell phones. Jack urged the crowd to put down their devices and live in the moment – he made photos of the performance available for free on his website, jackwhiteiii.com, so that fans could have high-quality keepsakes without missing a beat. The audience cheered unanimously at his request. Instead of a sea of small blue lights, the pit was starkly black against the bright blue stage.

When the curtains closed at the end of Jack’s acoustic set, the screams and applause tapered off. Then a low chant crept up from all corners of the crowd, and soon every person in the room was bellowing the riff from the White Stripes’ “Seven Nation Army.” After a few dozen chants, the band tore off into a medley of White Stripes songs, all building up to the inevitable end. When the first chord of “Seven Nation Army” rang out, every fan sang the same guttural chant. Each word of the song was echoed back from the pitch black crowd. After a world-rocking mix of genres and generations, this perennial favorite was the perfect finale.

September 29, 2014

Reporters

Haley Walker


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It wasn’t long ago when the Miami Hurricanes’ Class of 2020 included the top three rising senior pro ...

The Atlantic Coast Conference Baseball Championship schedule is set. The No. 4 seed Miami Hurricanes ...

The first regular season of Gino DiMare’s head-coaching era ended Saturday at Mark Light Field. But ...

The Miami Hurricanes’ hopes for hosting an NCAA regional were damaged a bit on Friday night by a 12- ...

It took a long time for Dewan Hernandez to reach a point of acceptance for what happened to his juni ...

Imagine simulating diabetes, lung cancer, or heart disease on a device no larger than a credit card. ...

Alabama’s new abortion law puts the issue of women’s rights in the spotlight for the upcoming 2020 e ...

The University of Miami is shaping the future of education by using innovative approaches that drive ...

Six short films created by University of Miami film students will be screened in Los Angeles this we ...

Researchers from 16 Latin American and Caribbean countries, hosted by the Institute for the Advanced ...

Four Miami Hurricanes were among those recognized by the Atlantic Coast Conference Monday for their ...

The University of Miami track and field program garnered 20 entries in the 2019 NCAA East Preliminar ...

Miami's schedule features seven matches against teams that reached the NCAA Championship. ...

The Canes head to the ACC Baseball Championship ranked in the top 20 in every major poll. ...

Beatrice Mompremier of the Miami women's basketball team will once again represent her country ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.