Edge, Movies, Reviews

‘Cuban Fury’ encourages audience to chase after passions

We’ve all felt inadequate at some point, especially when compared to the majesty of our love interest. But “Cuban Fury,” the latest film by Nick Frost, advocates channeling this adoration into the realization of a passion.

Frost, who was the writer of both “Hot Fuzz” and “Paul,” wrote and stars in “Cuban Fury” as Bruce, the overweight and undervalued average bloke who falls for the gorgeous new boss (played by Rashida Jones). Once an avid salsa dancer on the verge of winning the junior title, he gave up his vocation after a bullying incident. But upon discovering the boss is also a salsa dancer, Bruce decides to dust off his old dancing shoes.

Meanwhile, his office rival Drew, played by Chris O’Dowd, mocks him, saying “women like that use guys like you to get advice about men like me.” While Drew’s mockery cuts into old wounds, once Bruce focuses on the goal of reigniting his salsa flame, the derisions actually spark the fire, exploding into a full-fledged dance duel.

Reminiscent of the tone and style of the flick “Love Actually,” but with a twist like “Dirty Dancing,” this British rom-com is a story of hope for the underdog. With its bubbly (albeit at times wry) tone, the film conveys the message that being caring and passionate can be enough to win anyone over.

Contrasting the crude British humor of Bruce’s and Drew’s interplay is the elegant way that the mockery metaphorically vocalizes the doubts in Bruce’s own mind. Bullying does not necessarily mean boys stuffing your mouth with sequins and forcing you to eat them. It’s also our own doubts that keep us from doing what we love.

Nick Frost encouraged everyone to chase their passion at a media screening at Regal Cinema in South Beach.

“It’s about passion being attractive,” said Frost.”A six-pack will wilt and die; passion doesn’t. Sexy isn’t about a six-pack – it comes from within.”

Frost was adamant about doing all the dance work himself. But when he first saw the dance performed by the choreographers, he feared it would be impossible. He says he felt “like a bear at some Victorian circus.”

“Secretly, I’d always wanted to be a dancer,” he admitted.

Yet, after seven months of torturous training and taping up his blistered feet, Frost was able to perform the finale scene himself. This scene is a source of pride for him.

“I will always have that, regardless of how the film does in box office,” said Frost. “I f**king did that.”

Truly, it’s impossible to see the last scene with its pulsing music and not want to get up from your seat and tap your feet. Thanks to Frost’s endearing character, the film is as infectious, with a hopeful message.

“If you like it – not even if you’re good at it – then that’s enough,” Frost said. “Don’t give up.”

April 13, 2014

Reporters

Luisa Andonie


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