Basketball, Club/Intramural Sports, Sports

Indoor courts open after restoration

The Wellness Center’s indoor basketball facility has been reopened, and the usual crowds have returned to the courts after a brief hiatus.

Last month, the gym closed down the courts for a weeklong restoration.  So many students were playing basketball that the wood courts were getting worn down.

The courts underwent a resurfacing in order to keep them in optimal condition, said Norm Parsons, director of the Wellness Center.

“The 18-year-old courts take a constant beating from students and faculty,” Parsons said.

He explained that the restoration will help keep them in good condition for the constant foot traffic.

“The courts were resurfaced due to overuse,’’ Parsons said. “It has to be done in order to keep the courts in playable condition.”

The courts were first sanded and other minimal fixes were made before a new wax was reapplied.

More severe wear and tear would have necessitated sanding the courts down to a bare minimum to remove the lines before applying a coat of polyurethane.

“Luckily for us, we only needed the first type,” Parsons said.

The indoor courts were becoming rundown and students were starting to feel it, with traction on the courts becoming an issue.

More and more players were losing their footing while trying to compete.

The wellness center is an 1,800 square-foot gymnasium with basketball courts on the upper level. Three courts – each 75 feet long by 50 feet wide – lay side by side.  On average, 3,500 to 4,000 people attend and use the facilities every day, Parsons said.

During the time when the courts were closed, basketball enthusiasts were forced to play elsewhere.

Many went to the outdoor courts, but players say they prefer to stay inside because of the heat outside on the asphalt courts. The outdoor courts also became crowded, discouraging some from playing.

February 16, 2014

Reporters

Jake Hakanson


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