Opinion

Resolve to change past the new year

The new year has begun, and time is already ticking. People put pen to paper as they list resolutions they want to accomplish before the year’s end. I too, am one of these people, creating a laundry list of goals, but I can’t help but feel a strong sense of deja vu. Everything’s the same: the urgent optimism, the lengthy lists and, worst of all, the resolutions. Realizing this, I had to ask: how many resolutions did I accomplish last year?

For me, the answer misses the goal. Usually, New Year’s Eve rolls in, and I’m on a holiday high. I can’t help but be starry-eyed and consider the opportunities riddling the next 365 days. Promise upon promise is made: become more fit, catch up on my reading and make more money, all by the end of the year. Eventually, these promises degrade into problems: daily jog routines run into a wall, Facebook keeps my face out of books and I’m a college student, so no money there. Months march on, and nothing gets done. Frankly, I soon consider the year a fail.

Why do some of my – and perhaps yours as well – resolutions fall by the wayside once the year starts rolling?

How we treat our resolutions breeds their irresolution. We’ve trapped ourselves into thinking that everything we do falls along a strict timeline: to accomplish goal A is to do X, Y and Z by times one, two and three, exclusively. This idea isn’t wholly bad; when you have an assignment due soon, a strict timeline is needed. The same applies to anything physical that has to be done by a certain time. Changing intangible things, however, cannot be restricted to a timeline. People often resolve to be healthier or smarter with decisions – tasks linked to improving self-image. Self-image isn’t an assignment that can be started and completed. It’s something developed and altered throughout our lives. Confining this process to 365 days is like taking the stress of a lifetime and stuffing it into a year. We simply can’t handle that. If you thought finals week was bad, try a “finals” year.

Resolutions, then, need to be prolonged goals, rather than items on a timely list. Change can happen at any time. Didn’t reach your goal from a year ago? Not a problem. Keep working at it. The time between who you are now and who you wish to be is limitless.

 

Sherman Hewitt is an undeclared freshman.

January 15, 2014

Reporters

Sherman Hewitt


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

For the first time since Mark Richt benched N’Kosi Perry for Malik Rosier in the Miami Hurricanes’ l ...

The Miami Hurricanes’ offense has struggled for about a month now and Saturday there was no bigger c ...

Thoughts and postscripts after UM’s 27-21 loss at Georgia Tech on Saturday: ▪ If Mark Richt intends ...

The Miami Hurricanes have spiraled into a deep dive, with little time left to surface for air. In a ...

When Jack Spicer first booted away a 38-yard punt early in the second quarter against the Georgia Te ...

Get set for a whirlwind of information on critical issues facing the planet and how to tell those st ...

Professors and staff from UM are offering students an in-class introduction to gardening and food pr ...

The 2018 midterm election shifts the balance of power in Congress, with women playing a huge role. ...

UM alumna, one-time Miami Dolphins cheerleader, and National Geographic explorer Mireya Mayor lives ...

The “It’s On Us” Student Ambassador Program empowers peers to overcome sexual misconduct and gender ...

The Hurricanes advance to the Preseason WNIT semifinals. ...

The University of Miami volleyball team fell to North Carolina, 3-1, on Veteran's Day at Carmic ...

The No. 25/24 Miami women's basketball team will resume play in the Preseason WNIT Sunday after ...

The Hurricanes fall to Georgia Tech in Atlanta Saturday night. ...

Freshmen Franco Aubone and Kaya Gore of the University of Miami men's tennis team captured a do ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.