Opinion

Bus handling dampens game day

During Saturday’s football game against Virginia Tech, the student buses to campus began returning at halftime. But in the midst of the rainy and windy night, there was much disorder.

The discomfort of the rain made students want to leave the game early, even though the university has been trying to encourage us to stay until the end.

The line of students waiting for buses – which I was a part of – was, understandably, longer than usual. Yet, there was not enough direction coming from the staff monitoring the lines. While students were told to make the trek to the end, many cut the line as soon as they saw friends who had spots closer to the front.

Many of those students were not caught or reprimanded, as the staff seemed inattentive – just as eager to get out of the rain as the students. This disorder upset the cold and impatient students standing in line, including my friends.

Dripping wet in the rain, the football game attendees huddled up as they tried to keep warm. Meanwhile, loading all of the students onto the buses proved to be a bitterly slow process, even for those who’d left the game early in an attempt to avoid long lines.

We were eager to get out of the rain, but also dreading stepping onto the buses for the sole reason that we might have to sit in the frigid air conditioning. And while many of the bus drivers were courteous enough to turn it off, others were not, even after students’ requests.

More assertiveness on the part of the staff overseeing the lines, cooperation from the bus drivers and advance preparation from the university would have made the process much quicker and smoother.

It may seem ideal to keep students in the stadium for the full duration of the game – especially when it’s Homecoming – but unexpected occurrences arise, such as inclement weather, that require our safe and prompt return to campus.

 

Emily Dabau is a freshman majoring in journalism and public relations.

November 10, 2013

Reporters

Emily Dabau


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

June is a huge recruiting month for the Miami Hurricanes. It concludes with Paradise Camp on June 22 ...

The University of Miami showed women’s basketball coach Katie Meier how much it appreciates her on F ...

Frank Garis first watched Jalen Rivers from the opposite sideline, and the offensive lineman was imp ...

George Stewart had a big problem, and little time to solve it. It was Week 6 of the 2018 season, and ...

One of the interesting subplots of this Hurricanes season will be watching the evolution of a bunch ...

The Emmy Award-winning journalist, who grew up in Miami and started her career in Spanish language t ...

Nursing researchers and music therapists test a simple and cost-effective way of motivating critical ...

The University of Miami Libraries offer readers multiple ways to access the books, which are popular ...

Rosenstiel School researcher Martin Grosell weighs in on how marine life in the Gulf could be affect ...

Varona, an attorney and educator who specializes in administrative law, communications and media law ...

University of Miami Director of Athletics Blake James announced Friday a contract extension for head ...

Adrian Del Castillo garnered his second Freshman All-America honor of the year, appearing on the Per ...

Two-time Miami women's basketball team co-captain Laura Cornelius is set to start her professio ...

Courtney spent nine years previously on Jim Larranaga's staff from 1996-2005. ...

The University of Miami track and field program received 17 All-America honors at the conclusion of ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.