Best of Miami, Edge, Music

Big Night in Little Haiti

Konpa music legends Les Freres Dejean and Aroze play at the Haitian Cultural Center during the September "Big Night in Little Haiti" event. Morgan Coleman // Contributing Photographer

Les Freres Dejean and Aroze, who play the Haitian music genre of kompa, play at the Little Haiti Cultural Center during September’s Big Night in Little Haiti event.
Morgan Coleman // Contributing Photographer

 

When it comes to the Miami music and culture scene, nothing’s free. Ultra tickets cost $300 for the weekend; a performance at the Arsht Center can cost $40 or more; even a tour of the Wynwood Art Walk costs $20.

This is a rough reality to face for fans of the arts – especially when they’re broke college students. But for those who still want to have a good time and expand their horizons without breaking the bank, there’s Big Night in Little Haiti.

Big Night in Little Haiti is a cultural event sponsored by the Rhythm Foundation, a South Florida nonprofit organization. It is held every third Friday of the month from 6 to 10 p.m. at the Little Haiti Cultural Center (LHCC).

The second you walk toward the LHCC’s courtyard, you will be swept up by the energy of the crowd and the music. Starting at 6 p.m., the center is crowded with people of all ages, dancing and eating.

There are several bands and DJs featured during each event. In the past, acts have included notable Haitian bands like Tabou Combo and T-Vice. Many of the bands play kompa, a Haitian musical style similar to meringue.

Big Night in Little Haiti also provides the opportunity to explore the LHCC.

The gallery is open during the event and features a rotating art show. There is a room where kids can go and participate in crafts during the show. Outside, there are vendors selling sorbet and Prestige beer, as well as a station where you can get authentic Haitian cuisine.

Adam Ganuza, the production coordinator for the Rhythm Foundation, explained that he hoped the event will help “fight back against the mal-impression” that surrounds Little Haiti and “get as much mileage as possible” out of the picturesque LHCC.

The Little Haiti Cultural Center is located at 212 NE 59th Terrace. For more information, go to http://www.rhythmfoundation.com/series/big-night-in-little-haiti/.

October 13, 2013

Reporters

Marlee Lisker


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Three-point defense isn’t enough of a weakness for the Miami Hurricanes to call it a full-fledged Ac ...

Shaquille Quarterman waited less than 24 hours after Michael Pinckney announced he was returning for ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Wednesday: ▪ Two highly skilled receivers who ended last season frust ...

Whenever quarterback Tate Martell hurls a football to University of Miami slot receiver Mike Harley, ...

Manny Diaz is the dealer. The pusher. He is good at this. Really good. And what he is selling, we ar ...

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education approved plans developed by the Miller School of Medicine ...

Activist Claudio Rojas was featured in a documentary film, “The Infiltrators,” which is critical of ...

Associate professors William Pestle and Kathleen Sullivan Sealey traveled with students over spring ...

Muslim Students of the University of Miami will hold a prayer service at 12:45 p.m. Friday at the La ...

The theme of the 48th annual Women’s Commission Breakfast keynote address, delivered by Dean Laura K ...

The fourth-seeded Miami women's basketball team opens NCAA Tournament play on its home court fo ...

Make no mistake about it – the college paths of this dynamic Miami offensive duo are as stark in con ...

University of Miami redshirt sophomore Alicia Blagg captured the first NCAA postseason recognition o ...

 It is hard not to think of Miami's Amy Deem when you think of trail blazers in the track and f ...

Friday will be the Breast Cancer Awareness Pink Game, while Saturday is Bark in the Park. ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.