Opinion

Sororities in south stop segregation

Nearly five decades ago, civil rights leaders in America fought to end racial segregation. Nonetheless, it was only last week that University of Alabama’s traditionally white sororities finally became integrated.

Sororities aim to build distinct communities of people who share the same values. However, much of the recruitment process is based on initial judgements, whether physical or otherwise. Girls who choose to rush sororities should educate themselves about what exactly the process entails.

During the sorority recruitment process,  girls tend to be judged every step of the way. As a result, at many colleges, sororities are defined by the uniformity of sisters’ body types, hair color and beyond.

While a person’s physical appearance does not equate to his or her personal beliefs or upbringing, girls know that they are joining organizations where first impressions matter.

Fortunately, the culture of Greek life at the University of Miami better reflects the diversity on our campus and in our city. Multi-ethnic sororities may seem segregated, but just as with social sororities, these groups are about connecting girls of a shared background.

This mindset is built into the selection process. Ultimately, a pledge class is formed with the hope that the girls hold themselves to the same ideals and standards that the sisters hold.

In a way, it is another form of segregation – the segregation of ideas – but it’s only natural. Even outside of Greek organizations, people tend to make friends with people who have similar qualities.

But, a person should never be judged based on appearance ­– be it skin color or designer dresses. However, those who choose to get involved in Greek life know what’s coming. It may be a judgement process, but it is up to each individual to decide if it is right for them.

 

 

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

September 25, 2013

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Three of four University of Miami scholarship quarterbacks were suspended at various times this seas ...

While the University of Miami offense has struggled mightily this season, its defense has been stell ...

The Pittsburgh Panthers boast one of the best rushing offenses in the country. On Saturday, the Miam ...

After watching several juniors turn pro and then go late in the draft or not at all in recent years, ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Monday: ▪ If you ever wondered what the Hurricanes would look like if ...

Erin Kobetz, director of Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center’s Firefighter Cancer Initiative, disc ...

Kristiana Yao, who graduated summa cum laude in May, said she was “still in shock” after finding out ...

UM Libraries is presenting an extraordinary exhibit that immerses the audience in an emotional journ ...

A UM researcher is helping to lead a study on how smoke interacts with clouds and its impact on the ...

People are bombarded with news and information these days, providing opportunities for discourse tha ...

The Miami women's basketball team jumped two spots to No. 22 nationally in the first in-season ...

The Canes got back to their winning ways with an impressive 38-14 victory at Virginia Tech. ...

The No. 24 Miami women's basketball team dropped a 75-52 decision Sunday at Iowa State in the P ...

20-point performances from Chris Lykes and DJ Vasiljevic led Miami past Bethune-Cookman. ...

The University of Miami volleyball team forced No. 10 Pitt to five sets in a thrilling match on Seni ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.