Opinion

Sororities in south stop segregation

Nearly five decades ago, civil rights leaders in America fought to end racial segregation. Nonetheless, it was only last week that University of Alabama’s traditionally white sororities finally became integrated.

Sororities aim to build distinct communities of people who share the same values. However, much of the recruitment process is based on initial judgements, whether physical or otherwise. Girls who choose to rush sororities should educate themselves about what exactly the process entails.

During the sorority recruitment process,  girls tend to be judged every step of the way. As a result, at many colleges, sororities are defined by the uniformity of sisters’ body types, hair color and beyond.

While a person’s physical appearance does not equate to his or her personal beliefs or upbringing, girls know that they are joining organizations where first impressions matter.

Fortunately, the culture of Greek life at the University of Miami better reflects the diversity on our campus and in our city. Multi-ethnic sororities may seem segregated, but just as with social sororities, these groups are about connecting girls of a shared background.

This mindset is built into the selection process. Ultimately, a pledge class is formed with the hope that the girls hold themselves to the same ideals and standards that the sisters hold.

In a way, it is another form of segregation – the segregation of ideas – but it’s only natural. Even outside of Greek organizations, people tend to make friends with people who have similar qualities.

But, a person should never be judged based on appearance ­– be it skin color or designer dresses. However, those who choose to get involved in Greek life know what’s coming. It may be a judgement process, but it is up to each individual to decide if it is right for them.

 

 

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

September 25, 2013

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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.