Uncategorized

Minor in teaching offered license upon graduation

Many college students had one goal after graduation – to find a job.

UM’s School of Education and Human Development offered students a real advantage in today’s tough economy with the professional training option (PTO) minor.

The Florida Department of Education developed the PTO, an 18-credit minor that gives non-education majors the opportunity to become certified secondary school teachers (grades 6-12) in the state of Florida.

“PTO is a wonderful opportunity to have a back-up plan after college,” said Gina Astorini, director of undergraduate academic services and PTO advisor. “Especially since jobs are scarce, this gives students a path to their professional careers.”

Students needed to have a teachable major to be declared as a PTO minor, which has been offered since 2007. Teachable subjects included English, math, science, social studies, foreign languages and fine arts.

A student’s major, however, did not have to be specifically in English or science. The student needed to have general knowledge of the teachable subject in order to sit for the certification exam.

Senior Nicola Gonsalves was in secondary education, but switched to the PTO minor because it gave her the opportunity to major in psychology and math, and still become a teacher.

“I’ve always wanted to be a teacher,” she said. “I have a passion for it, and I like to take something that seems so difficult and make it simpler to understand. With the PTO, I was able to pick up psychology because I thought it would be good to know for a teaching career.”

Students can complete the minor within three consecutive semesters and then take the Florida Teacher Certification Exam and appropriate Subject Area Exam.

Upon passing the FTCE, the graduate receives a two-year temporary license to teach in Florida. After one year of teaching, the individual can apply for the five-year permanent license.

“It’s a great add-on for students who are far along in their major and would like to consider teaching after they graduate, but don’t necessarily have the time to complete a double major,” said Miriam Lipsky, manager of the school’s Project Include,  a federally-funded program that prepares teachers to instruct and support children with special needs.

July 11, 2013

Reporters

Andrea Jacobo


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Three-point defense isn’t enough of a weakness for the Miami Hurricanes to call it a full-fledged Ac ...

Shaquille Quarterman waited less than 24 hours after Michael Pinckney announced he was returning for ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Wednesday: ▪ Two highly skilled receivers who ended last season frust ...

Whenever quarterback Tate Martell hurls a football to University of Miami slot receiver Mike Harley, ...

Manny Diaz is the dealer. The pusher. He is good at this. Really good. And what he is selling, we ar ...

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education approved plans developed by the Miller School of Medicine ...

Activist Claudio Rojas was featured in a documentary film, “The Infiltrators,” which is critical of ...

Associate professors William Pestle and Kathleen Sullivan Sealey traveled with students over spring ...

Muslim Students of the University of Miami will hold a prayer service at 12:45 p.m. Friday at the La ...

The theme of the 48th annual Women’s Commission Breakfast keynote address, delivered by Dean Laura K ...

The fourth-seeded Miami women's basketball team opens NCAA Tournament play on its home court fo ...

Make no mistake about it – the college paths of this dynamic Miami offensive duo are as stark in con ...

University of Miami redshirt sophomore Alicia Blagg captured the first NCAA postseason recognition o ...

 It is hard not to think of Miami's Amy Deem when you think of trail blazers in the track and f ...

Friday will be the Breast Cancer Awareness Pink Game, while Saturday is Bark in the Park. ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.