Opinion

Miami crime robs students of safety

D

uring winter break, my frantic landlord in Miami called to inform me that the house I share with three roommates had been broken into. The majority of our belongings had been stolen, even with an alarm system installed.

College students routinely leave home for long periods of time or even for class. It is a thief’s dream come true. Last week, our neighbors experienced their second break-in while they were home. They were able to scare off the robbers, but now they rarely sleep at home.

“Don’t live in a house” is advice often thrown around among students because of the unsafe neighborhoods. However, living in an apartment complex is no guarantee either. My car was parked inside the Red Road Commons parking garage last year and was broken into overnight. My laptop and iPod were stolen out of my backpack. I discovered that Red Road Commons didn’t have cameras in their garage, let alone a security-enforced gate or front desk to contact for assistance. The cop who helped me file a report was way too accustomed to disgruntled UM students. Thieves regularly stroll into the garage completely aware of the lack of cameras.

University Village housing is the only nondorm housing on campus, but it’s only available to upperclassmen with a certain number of credits. Their rent runs at least $1,100 a month. One would think that the UV poses a solution, but last year my friend’s apartment in the UV was broken into overnight while he and his roommates were sleeping. The robber was armed. Two of the three roommates moved out, fearing the robber would return.

Our disturbing robbery incident reflects a greater issue  in Miami. It would be a crime for the university not to at least brainstorm for ways to lend those of us drowning in tuition costs a hand, especially when 59 percent of students live off campus. A graduating Hurricane shouldn’t have been robbed of all of her sentimental hard-earned U pride memorabilia while away on holiday vacation.

Melanie Kleiner is a senior majoring in economics.

March 6, 2013

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Melanie Kleiner


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.