News

Launch Pad initiative targets start-up companies

In 2008, The Launch Pad opened its doors at the University of Miami with the goal to facilitate students’ business endeavors. Four years later, the Pad has gone viral.

The Launch Pad has collaborated with public and private sectors, which include the Miami Downtown Development Authority (DDA) and Miami-Dade County, to create the Tech Accelerator. This initiative targets tech start-up companies in industries such as healthcare, hospitality, tourism and the creative arts sector.

Susan Amat, the co-founder and executive director of The Launch Pad, is looking forward to the opening of Miami’s accelerator in Downtown.

“There are hundreds of other [business]incubators, but ours is so different,” she said. “We are focused on community development, not starting a business to make money.”

The accelerator is open to any person with a start-up company. After the submission deadline, Nov. 5, applications will be reviewed and the best 10 companies will be accepted. If some of these companies are not local, the accelerator will move them to Miami.

The selected companies will receive three months of entrepreneurial extensive training, a year of free space, access to the accelerator’s resources and “world class” mentoring, Amat said.

And students will also benefit from the accelerator’s fellowships and internships.

Chelsea Cook, a freshman majoring in entrepreneurship, said the idea of The Launch Pad’s accelerator intrigues her.

“I think it will provide a lot more opportunities for students with entrepreneurial pursuits,” Cook said.

The accelerator was made possible with the financial support of the DDA and the Office of the Mayor, Carlos A. Gimenez. The DDA awarded two grants totaling $450,000, and the mayor’s office committed $1 million in grants.

Marc Sarnoff, a City of Miami commissioner and chairman of the DDA, was a main advocate for the development of the accelerator, Amat said.

“We are extremely well situated to build on the premise that we can be and are and should be a technology city,” he said in an article reported by The Miami Herald.

Amat echoes Sarnoff’s belief.

“The grant proves that Miami is open for business,” she said. “Miami will become a technology epicenter.”

October 10, 2012

Reporters

Elizabeth De Armas

Alexander Gonzalez

Assistant Editor


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

It sure sounds like redshirt freshman N’Kosi Perry is going to get his first career start at 8 Thurs ...

If he hasn’t made it already, Miami Hurricanes coach Mark Richt has a defining decision to ponder in ...

They were way below the radar coming into the 1983 season. And after their 28-3 opening-game loss to ...

In the opening eight minutes on Saturday — and the final seven minutes — FIU looked like a team that ...

The N’Kosi Perry era is here. Whether it’s here to stay is yet to be seen. The fans got what they wa ...

Get Out The Vote, a nonpartisan initiative headed by the Division of Student Affairs and the Butler ...

University of Miami Libraries commemorates Banned Books Week with a special event and display. ...

A year after UPup’s founding father met his match, the service club is realizing its goal of becomin ...

UM students, faculty and staff commemorated the five-year anniversary of the Donna E. Shalala Studen ...

Miami’s Turnover Chain inspires copycats, but the U’s turnover prop has a ‘cool factor.’ ...

The Miami Hurricanes were one of the biggest risers in both major polls released Sunday, jumping to ...

Estela Perez-Somarriba of the Miami women's tennis team earned one of the most prestigious coll ...

The University of Miami volleyball program defeated Duke, 3-1, winning its fourth straight match and ...

N'Kosi Perry and a dominant Miami defense led the Hurricanes to a 31-17 victory over the Panthe ...

The season-opening, three-day Miami Fall Invite wrapped up Sunday at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center a ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.