Opinion

MTV should restore its identity

You’ve been living under a rock, oblivious to MTV’s existence, but while channel surfing you come across “Music Television” and get excited about the idea of watching music videos, interviews with artists, and the inside scoop of the music industry 24 hours a day. What a dream network.

But MTV’s current airing schedule consists of shows by the name of “16 and Pregnant,” “Punk’d” and “Jersey Shore.”  MTV’s original identity has disintegrated in accordance with the reality television craze. As Justin Timberlake said in his 2007 VMA acceptance speech, “Play more damn videos [MTV].”

According to the TV Guide listings, in a 12-hour day, MTV airs music-related shows for five hours from 3 to 8 a.m. (because so many people are awake, let alone looking to watch music videos at that hour). What’s on during the remaining seven hours? Reality television.

In 2008, MTV reached a turning point upon the cancellation of one of its longest running shows, “Total Request Live.” “TRL” aired from Monday to Thursday for one hour, showing the top-10 voted music videos and featured special guests. “TRL” was one of MTV’s most signature music-based shows.

Since the end of “TRL,” MTV has resorted to Snookie and The Situation as its signatures, caving to their outrageous social antics and stereotypical appearances. I hope the executives of MTV feel good about themselves. It’s entertaining and revenue boosting, but where’s the substance, not to mention the music? Other than a laugh, it is detrimental to music and society. The general public has ironically lost touch with reality, forgetting that MTV stands for Music Television. What has Snookie done for the music industry?

The music industry needs a hand and the role of MTV is key to its recovery. There are endless ways MTV could restore its true music-oriented identity and still thrive. Take Timberlake’s advice and play more videos to support the artists and re-establish MTV’s reputation. Not only is reality television encouraging young adults to emulate outrageous behavior, but its takeover of MTV is contributing to the downward spiral of the music industry. Either formally change the network name to RTV (Reality Television) or bring the music back.

 

Melanie Kleiner is a junior majoring in economics. 

April 25, 2012

Reporters

Melanie Kleiner


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Boston College star Ky Bowman came down with a 102-degree fever on Saturday night. Jordan Chatman an ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Sunday: ▪ New UM defensive coordinator Blake Baker has asked UM ...

Emese Hof and No. 20 Miami think they can play with anyone, and it shows. Hof scored 18 of her 25 po ...

New University of Miami baseball head coach Gino DiMare wanted to start strong. He got perfection. T ...

Former University of Miami star running back Mark Walton was arrested late Friday on a charge of mis ...

UM alumna Alina Mayo Azze, who has covered a myriad of topics during her 37-year career, has been a ...

Happiness and well-being scholar Tal Ben-Shahar is UM’s newest Distinguished Presidential Scholar. ...

The University of Miami will host the first symposium to explore LGBTQ human rights across the Ameri ...

UM experts react to a new ban that prohibits people in Key West from using certain types of sunscree ...

A matchmaker extraordinaire, Ricardo Cepeda, the manager of the UM Zebrafish Facility, is passionate ...

The No. 20 Miami women's basketball team stormed back from a 14-point deficit to pick up the bi ...

Brian Van Belle struck out five over six shutout innings to help the Canes sweep Rutgers on opening ...

The Hurricanes dropped a tight contest with the Eagles in Chestnut Hill, 64-57. ...

The sophomore first baseman slugged his second homer of the weekend to lead the Canes to a series wi ...

Junior Renate Grimstad led the way for Miami and is tied for 18th at one-over-par, while sophomore K ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.