Opinion

Cell phone billing burdens students

After the latest unveiling of the iPhone 4S, wireless companies couldn’t wait to announce their so-called valuable rate plans: $199 for an iPhone 4S, $99 for an iPhone 4 8GB and an iPhone 3GS 8GB for free. These prices may be getting you excited, but looks can be deceiving.

Students are usually surprised about their monthly mobile payment.

“Even if I don’t often use my net data on my phone, my monthly payments for my iPhone 4 are usually over $100,” junior Elvi Shi complained.

Most UM students have faced a similar situation.

Wireless companies can give you hundreds of reasons to explain their charging methods and viewing your billing history is amongst the most common. Meanwhile, the so-called billing history consists of hundreds of different numbers you have to calculate in order to get the accurate payment.

This takes way too much time for a college student juggling class, homework and bills.

Wireless companies go as far as charging someone for data they didn’t even use. When phones get stolen and the person who now has your phone was able to buy some music and apps, do you think they edit your bill? No.

Junior Yunhan Ranwho lost her phone last month and was charged more than $1,000, even though she told the company her phone had been misplaced.

“I tried to negotiate with the wireless company, but they told me that they are not responsible to find who was using the phone and every charge is based on billing history only,” Ranwho said. “I was very angry.”

Students have been concerned with their monthly mobile payment for a while now. Cell phones are a part of our daily lives and it’s time for wireless companies to pay more attention to students and make plans more economical, not to mention make billing history details reader-friendly.

 

Jing Xu is a junior majoring in public relations and economics.


February 8, 2012

Reporters

Jing Xu


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The Miami Hurricanes have had almost a week to regroup after a road loss at Boston College, and they ...

Sam Brooks stood on the field at Orlando’s Camping World Stadium, tears welling up in his eyes, and ...

The Miami Hurricanes had just stunned second-ranked Louisville on the road last Sunday, in front of ...

Willie Moise was willing to give the Miami Hurricanes the benefit of the doubt when Manny Diaz left ...

The tweets that foreshadowed Thursday’s news for the Miami Hurricanes began the third week of Januar ...

Without their foresight and love of homeland, the collection—the largest repository of Cuban documen ...

In the wake of Justice Thomas’s jaw-dropping statement, UM media law experts weigh in on the landmar ...

Which film will win Best Picture? Who will be Best Actor? We asked the experts. ...

Political unrest has swept through Haiti recently, spurred on by escalating prices and alleged polit ...

Prominent music scholar Kyra Gaunt will deliver a talk Friday about her research into the racial opp ...

Michael Amditis hit his first career home run to lead the Canes past the Gators. ...

Three Miami track and field athletes made their way to the podium on Day 2 of the ACC Indoor Champio ...

In Friday's ACC opener, the No. 35 University of Miami men's tennis team topped Georgia Te ...

Game time is 2 p.m. in Coral Gables. ...

The No. 14 Miami women's basketball team is set for its second in-state, top-25 showdown of the ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.