Opinion

Love, sex shouldn’t be free

“Morality is of the highest importance — not for God, but for us,” Albert Einstein said.
More than 50 years after his death, this quote is still relevant to us today. It builds on the idea that the motives behind words and actions have repercussions for others, as well as for society as a whole.
Let me explain by using the widely accepted hookup culture as an example. What I believe to be an offshoot of the “Free Love” movement of the 1960s, the hookup culture is particularly notable for the way it encourages people to use others as sexual objects.
We are told that the sexual objectification of women is reprehensible yet we’re bombarded by Hollywood (“No Strings Attached,” “Friends With Benefits” and every college movie ever made), by television shows (“Two and a Half Men,” “How I Met Your Mother” and many others) and by friends encouraging the use of others for sex.
There is also a double standard. Women who give in to sexual frenzy are labeled as whores, while men who have multiple partners are treated like champions. The consequences of a simple hookup, drunk or sober, extend long after the act of sex itself.
At some point in our lives, most of us imagine sex as a bonding moment between ourselves and someone that unconditionally loves us. We feel a sense of attachment to our romantic partner and that is alright.
Sex for the sake of love is OK because love is the ultimate gift you can give to someone. And the act is only truly pleasurable when an emotional component is involved. Otherwise, it’s just a physical gratification. However, sex is fun because it is subconsciously associated with procreation.
Reputations, integrity and self-esteem get tarnished only when people have sex for the wrong reasons, such as for boosting social status or because the desired person is attractive.
When a person uses another for anything (especially for sex), the other person feels worthless. Often enough, the perpetrator’s temporarily boosted self-esteem crashes as well. My worst experiences in life have been caused or worsened by friends not loving me in return. From what I have observed, the sex factor only multiplies those feelings of discontent and worthlessness. There’s no excuse for it.

Andrew Blitman is a senior majoring in marine affairs and biology.

September 28, 2011

Reporters

Andrew Blitman

Science Columnist


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

At 7:27 p.m Tuesday, University of Miami football coach Manny Diaz tweeted a GIF of a swirling Hurri ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Tuesday: ▪ As Miami awaits decisions from its potential 2019 qua ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Monday night: ▪ FIU has decided that its Nov. 23 football game agains ...

Dewan Hernandez hit another NCAA roadblock on Monday, but the University of Miami forward will take ...

Jeff Thomas will be joining the Illinois Fighting Illini after all. After a few days of discussion a ...

Grantees aim to eliminate opportunity gaps and biases in different realms and improve brain injury t ...

The film launches the 2019 film series for the UM Libraries Cuban Heritage Collection. ...

Here’s a go-to list of dates you should keep an eye on throughout the semester, along with some tidb ...

For more than 77 years, UM Hillel has provided a vibrant and diverse “home-away-from-home” that is f ...

University of Miami experts weigh in on the largest increase in carbon emissions in eight years. ...

The University of Miami football program has hired Dan Enos as its offensive coordinator and quarter ...

University of Miami head women's volleyball coach Jose "Keno" Gandara announced Monda ...

University of Miami Athletics announced Monday that it will host its fifth annual Celebration of Wom ...

After a weekend bye, the Miami women's basketball team resumes action Thursday evening at 7 p.m ...

Pictures from the No. 17 Miami women's tennis team's season-opening action in the Miami Sp ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.