Opinion

Technology helps with long distance

Relationships that started over vacations or began in high school are lasting. Studying abroad doesn’t mean it’s the end of a relationship either. Thanks to technology, the tradition of college dating has changed over the past few years.

Just like we have equated Facebook pokes with making a friendly gesture and Twitter updates with keeping in touch with others, today’s generation has conditioned itself to accept that love and technology go hand in hand.

In fact, communication tools such as Skype have contributed to the growing trend of long-distance relationships. Technology is improving campus-to-campus relationships and it’s never been easier to be in constant interaction with someone across the world. As long as couples have access to Facebook, text, Skype, iChat, BBM, e-mail and a phone, distance is no longer a barrier for couples (or for long-distance sexual play).

Not only has it allowed couples to stay in touch on a daily basis, but it also allows couples to peer into each other’s lives. Social media Web sites such as Facebook allow for virtual intimacy, which increases the understanding of each other’s lives. Through mini-feeds, wall posts, statuses, tagged photos and a user’s recent activity on Facebook, one is able to learn who someone is talking to, what they are doing, what they like, what is on their mind and more.

That being said, Facebook is an excellent communication tool to keep in touch with friends and family. But, in terms of being in a relationship with someone, is using Facebook as a resource a good thing? And how much virtual intimacy is too much?

Believe it or not, in many relationships fights have sparked over jealousy caused by something posted on Facebook. For example, an ex who posted a comment on a partner’s wall, tagged photos of someone dancing with someone else, or even lack of affection can unfortunately lead to unnecessary arguments. However, think about it like this- if two people are truly committed, are in a healthy relationship and trust each other, then communication tools such as Facebook should only strengthen a relationship.

As technology advances, it has potential to make every part of our lives better- including relationships. Thus, technology hasn’t robbed us of what used to be traditional love- instead, we believe it has solidified it.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.


February 13, 2011

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.