Opinion

Staff Editorial: Don’t replace food with booze

For some students, consuming alcohol means cutting back on calories. This new dietary trend is called “drunkorexia.”

Not only is the term self-explanatory, but it also raises awareness to this growing problem among college students. Known for the practice of trading food calories for those in alcohol, “drunkorexia” is a term that often comes up in the context of eating disorders and alcohol issues.

According to The Denver Post, health counselors on college campuses have noticed a variety of issues related to eating and drinking disorders. For example, some students diet and over-exercise to prepare for partying on the weekends, and some suffer from more serious problems such as anorexia, bulimia and binge-eating disorders.

“Drunkorexia” is most common among young college women who will forgo eating all day just so they can get drunk at night. As we know, consuming alcohol on an empty stomach allows you to feel the effect of alcohol quicker. After a long night of drinking on an empty stomach, they tend to binge on junk food. After feeling guilty for devouring junk food, they will vomit. This may seem like “no big deal” to some students, but its health effects are extremely severe.

In fact, Medical Director of the Eating Recovery Center in Denver Dr. Kenneth Weiner said that anorexia nervosa has the highest death rate of any psychiatric illness.

Has our nation’s craze for being skinny led us to this? In a recent news release, The National Eating Disorders Association stated that nearly 10 million women and one million men have an eating disorder and millions more struggle with binge-eating disorder.

With these statistics in mind, we must be aware of its negative consequences. Whether it’s dieting, over-exercising or more serious disorders such as bulimia, these are not the right ways to watch our waistline. Although students know it is wrong, they continue to live this unhealthy lifestyle, not recognizing its long-term affects.

If college campuses across the nation can raise awareness about this issue, we can prevent more students from falling into the “drunkorexia” category.

Editorials represent the majority view of The Miami Hurricane editorial board.

October 24, 2010

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Three-point defense isn’t enough of a weakness for the Miami Hurricanes to call it a full-fledged Ac ...

Shaquille Quarterman waited less than 24 hours after Michael Pinckney announced he was returning for ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Wednesday: ▪ Two highly skilled receivers who ended last season frust ...

Whenever quarterback Tate Martell hurls a football to University of Miami slot receiver Mike Harley, ...

Manny Diaz is the dealer. The pusher. He is good at this. Really good. And what he is selling, we ar ...

The Liaison Committee on Medical Education approved plans developed by the Miller School of Medicine ...

Activist Claudio Rojas was featured in a documentary film, “The Infiltrators,” which is critical of ...

Associate professors William Pestle and Kathleen Sullivan Sealey traveled with students over spring ...

Muslim Students of the University of Miami will hold a prayer service at 12:45 p.m. Friday at the La ...

The theme of the 48th annual Women’s Commission Breakfast keynote address, delivered by Dean Laura K ...

The fourth-seeded Miami women's basketball team opens NCAA Tournament play on its home court fo ...

Make no mistake about it – the college paths of this dynamic Miami offensive duo are as stark in con ...

University of Miami redshirt sophomore Alicia Blagg captured the first NCAA postseason recognition o ...

 It is hard not to think of Miami's Amy Deem when you think of trail blazers in the track and f ...

Friday will be the Breast Cancer Awareness Pink Game, while Saturday is Bark in the Park. ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.