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RSMAS provides hands-on learning experience

Recently named one of the top-five institutions in geosciences by Thomson Reuters’ “Essential Science Indicators,” UM’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science provides students with a unique, hands-on approach to learning.
Located on Virginia Key on a 65-acre marine research and education park, RSMAS offers majors in biological, chemical, geological and physical oceanography, marine biology, marine science/computer science, meteorology and marine affairs and policy.
This past spring, RSMAS launched the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program in conjunction with the Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. This program will follow the model set by the successful South Florida Student Shark Program in order to further the study and conservation of shark species in Florida waters.
“We will be able to expand the program to address other marine species and reach new audiences around the world,” said Neil Hammerschlag, director of the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program.
According to Hammerschlag, the program will even offer an “Adopt a Shark” program.
“[This program] will enable us to track great hammerhead and bull sharks using sophisticated satellite tags that students will help attach to live animals,” Hammerschlag said. “That will allow us to better understand their migratory routes and habits, which will assist us in creating stronger polices to protect these critically threatened species.”
Rising sophomore Cameron Rhodes participated in the Dunlap conservation program this past school year.
“It is very rare for students, especially freshmen, to be able to experience this kind of hands-on work,” Rhodes said. “RSMAS does a great job of making sure young students can get a wide variety of incredibly interesting internships and other opportunities.”
Rhodes recommends that incoming freshman and transfer students take advantage of the unique opportunities provided by RSMAS, and not count themselves out before they try.
“I never expected to receive such a great internship as a freshman, and fortunately I was accepted,” Rhodes said. “RSMAS helped make that possible.”
This past spring RSMAS also launched UGalapagos, a new study abroad program that allowed students majoring in marine affairs and marine science to study the Galapagos Islands’ brilliant biodiversity and endemic species.
The RSMAS campus, next to the Seaquarium on the Rickenbacker Causeway, is about eight miles away from the Coral Gables campus. Hurry ‘Canes shuttles run daily between the two campuses from about 7:45 a.m. to about 5:30 p.m.
“Undergraduates bring a new dimension and a new energy to our campus,” RSMAS communications director Barbra Gonzalez said. “They go out and do wonderful things.”
Sarah Hartnig may be contacted at shartnig@themiamihurricane.com.

Recently named one of the top-five institutions in geosciences by Thomson Reuters’ “Essential Science Indicators,” UM’s Rosenstiel School of Marine and Atmospheric Science provides students with a unique, hands-on approach to learning.Located on Virginia Key on a 65-acre marine research and education park, RSMAS offers majors in biological, chemical, geological and physical oceanography, marine biology, marine science/computer science, meteorology and marine affairs and policy.This past spring, RSMAS launched the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program in conjunction with the Leonard and Jayne Abess Center for Ecosystem Science and Policy. This program will follow the model set by the successful South Florida Student Shark Program in order to further the study and conservation of shark species in Florida waters.“We will be able to expand the program to address other marine species and reach new audiences around the world,” said Neil Hammerschlag, director of the R.J. Dunlap Marine Conservation Program.According to Hammerschlag, the program will even offer an “Adopt a Shark” program.“[This program] will enable us to track great hammerhead and bull sharks using sophisticated satellite tags that students will help attach to live animals,” Hammerschlag said. “That will allow us to better understand their migratory routes and habits, which will assist us in creating stronger polices to protect these critically threatened species.”Rising sophomore Cameron Rhodes participated in the Dunlap conservation program this past school year.“It is very rare for students, especially freshmen, to be able to experience this kind of hands-on work,” Rhodes said. “RSMAS does a great job of making sure young students can get a wide variety of incredibly interesting internships and other opportunities.”Rhodes recommends that incoming freshman and transfer students take advantage of the unique opportunities provided by RSMAS, and not count themselves out before they try.“I never expected to receive such a great internship as a freshman, and fortunately I was accepted,” Rhodes said. “RSMAS helped make that possible.”This past spring RSMAS also launched UGalapagos, a new study abroad program that allowed students majoring in marine affairs and marine science to study the Galapagos Islands’ brilliant biodiversity and endemic species.The RSMAS campus, next to the Seaquarium on the Rickenbacker Causeway, is about eight miles away from the Coral Gables campus. Hurry ‘Canes shuttles run daily between the two campuses from about 7:45 a.m. to about 5:30 p.m.“Undergraduates bring a new dimension and a new energy to our campus,” RSMAS communications director Barbra Gonzalez said. “They go out and do wonderful things.”

Sarah Hartnig may be contacted at shartnig@themiamihurricane.com.

July 22, 2010

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Sarah Hartnig

Contributing Columnist


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