Opinion

Why transferring isn’t the solution

Every budding 18-year-old begins college with high hopes and expectations of the next four years. They plan on having fun and making great memories and friends that they’ll keep for a lifetime. Incidentally, they’ll get an education while they’re there.

However, through a variety of things that may go wrong while they’re in their first year, it seems as though many college freshmen decide to transfer. By simply walking the halls, it’s not unlikely to hear the incessant repetition of kids saying things like, “I want to be closer to home,” “I really don’t like it here,” and “I want to go somewhere better!”

But the constant inner battle never quite ends. Either these kids transfer and forever question if they made the right decision, or they stay and always dream about better living. The infinite paradox never quite ends.

So, why do students not like their school? My assumption is that those very people who want to leave their universities in hopes of a better place initially had unreasonable expectations for the places they were going. They may have expected amazing hook-ups, phenomenal teachers and perfect friends. Whatever they thought was coming, they soon realize those things were not realistic. And they crack. Instead of being grateful to the colleges they were attending, they assume the “grass is greener” at whatever new school they consider.

The solution? Be happy with your decision and find the positives of the school you’re attending. Whether the reason is the nightlife, your major or a friendly teacher who recommended a book to you, be glad you were given the opportunity to attend a university at all, rather than becoming the cliché “grease monkey” at Dominic’s Auto Parts.

Dan Buyanovsky is a freshman majoring in entrepreneurship. He may be contacted at d.buyanovsky@umiami.edu.

April 7, 2008

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.