News

Law school admissions keeps average LSAT rule

Many law schools are now evaluating applicants based on their highest LSAT score rather than their average score, though the University of Miami Law School is not one of them.

This trend is due to a recent American Bar Association policy change. Before June 2006, law schools submitted data based on the average score of their incoming class. Now the ABA asks for incoming students’ highest scores.

Michael L. Goodnight, assistant dean of Admissions and Enrollment Management for UM’s law school, said the admissions process is not going to change, noting that the Law School Admissions Council determined that students’ average scores are most indicative of their first-year performance.

“We’ve always taken a look at all the scores,” Goodnight said. “If there is a large discrepancy between two scores, we ask a student why that happened and we may still take the top score. That’s always been our policy.”

The change in LSAT score evaluation may attract more pre-law students, said Eva M. Alonso, director of Transfer and Pre-Law Advising.

“In the past you would always take the test once and your LSAT score was your scarlet letter,” Alonso said. “If you got a 148, you’re scarred for life. Now there’s hope.”

Karin Dreyer and Rebecca Sarinsky, both first year law students, agree that more people will take the test multiple times.

“People will study lighter,” Sarinsky said. “People will take it once just to see how they do.”

Goodnight said the number of times a student takes the LSAT will not affect the goal of the admission process.

“Our goal is to determine as best we can if a student is going to be successful,” Goodnight said. “That’s the bottom line.”

Kelly Herson may be contacted at k.herson@umiami.edu.

November 8, 2007

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

While the University of Miami has just three Class of 2019 oral commitments on offense, the Canes ha ...

Gerald Willis’ monster season has earned another piece of national recognition. On Monday, the Miami ...

It hasn’t been a great few weeks on the recruiting trail for the Miami Hurricanes with regards to of ...

A six-pack of Heat notes, leading up to Heat-Lakers on Monday night: ▪ In the days before one of his ...

A six-pack of Canes notes on a Friday: ▪ UM coach Mark Richt hasn’t yet given any indication to the ...

Most UM Debate Team members devote 10 to 15 hours of preparation for each tournament. ...

National Geographic connects with the University of Miami to empower the next generation of storytel ...

Following national recognition for its French production of Cinderella, the Frost Opera Theater is d ...

Several UM art students are getting real-world exposure during a highly anticipated – and attended – ...

Over the past several years, more and more students are using UM Libraries as a study place, a meeti ...

Gerald Willis III added to his postseason awards list, picking up second-team All-America honors fro ...

Following its longest break of the season thus far, the No. 25/23 Miami women's basketball team ...

Miami head women's tennis coach Paige Yaroshuk-Tews announced Friday the signing of two players ...

After a six-day layoff, the No. 25/23 Miami women's basketball team will be back in action Sund ...

University of Miami redshirt senior defensive tackle Gerald Willis III was recognized for his outsta ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.