Edge

Tune your iPod into these new, alternative sounds

Benassi Brothers, Phobia

Pure electro-pop and dance, the 12-album track is high energy. Infused with some voice-box alternated female voices and repetitive lyrics such as “I am waiting for you,” this album maintains the same sound from beginning to end. As a general statement, the songs fit the typical stereotype of electro music.

Bill Madden, Gone

A deep breathy voice serenades listeners about self-examination and love, while accompanied by classic guitar strumming and simple melodies. The first few songs start slow and simple, like a train that has just started up the tracks. There’s a soothing sound that resonates through the music and is reminiscent of a mix of soft rock and folk.

Dem Franchise Boys,

Dem Franchise Boys

Laying down lyrics about strippers, the projects and anything old school, the lyrics of Dem Franchize Boys seem rather lackluster. However, their popularity across radio stations can’t be denied and their surprisingly intoxicating beats won’t leave your mind, that’s if you like this kind of music. In addition to already noted favorites, “I think they Like Me,” and “Lean Wit it, Rock Wit it,” the Boys push out a few other catchy tracks that are sure to hit airwaves soon.

E-40, My Ghetto Report Card Touted as one of the originals, E-40 and his latest album, My Ghetto Report Card, is a choppy mix of hard-edged rap and hooks interlaced with trumpet and other unexpected instruments. For the most part, the lyrics of E-40 are intriguing if you pay attention enough to catch the words; able to speak at an incredible speed, his words are somewhat hard to understand, when not the hook. Impressive enough are the 14-tracks that feature myriad artists such as T. Pain and Mike Jones.

Men, Women, & Children, Men, Women, and Children Kitchsy and full of emo-rock energy, the songs combine catchy lyrics with a certain edge while keeping up with the fast chords of guitar and drums. In addition, songs like “Photosynthesis,” contain a certain, pac-man video game sound and song titles like “Who found Mr. Fabulous?” and “Monkey Monkee Man,” add the respective playfulness that exudes from every aspect of this album.

April 11, 2006

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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