Edge

Death Cab has excellent Plans

With new label intact, indie rock sensation Death Cab for Cutie has moved up in the world, so to speak. Ignoring the big no-no that is signing to a major label after several years of success on an indie one, Death Cab has made the leap that most indie groups dream of and dread at the same time. Nevertheless, while die-hard fans assert that the band had sold its butcher’s knife for vegetable cutters, the music remains as sharp as ever.

Plans is filled with melancholy, earthy tunes reminiscent of singer/songwriter Ben Gibbard’s other musical group, The Postal Service. Unlike Give Up, though, every song on Plans stands on its own. The album, in comparison with recent album releases, is also very organized. You can feel the connection of each song as it progresses as well as the consistency of mood that is carried from chorus to chorus.

Despite its tone, the album is fairly hopeful compared to Death Cab’s earlier efforts. It almost feels like pessimism has become a requirement for indie bands, so the change is more than welcome. Gibbard’s lyrics are stronger than ever here. The actual music almost seems secondary sometimes when compared to the accomplished power of Gibbard’s words. When Gibbard sings, “But I didn’t care where I was going. They’re all different names for the same thing,” you can feel the weight of the world crush down on you, but at least there’s someone to identify with. Certain emotions just seem impossible to convey on paper, but Gibbard always seems to find a way.

This album might as well be Gibbard’s heart served on a silver platter. Filled with poetry and compassion, it sets a new standard for indie rock- and maybe it will finally conquer the assumption that major labels destroy bands.

Danny Gordon can be contacted at d.gordon@umiami.edu.

October 4, 2005

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Former University of Miami star running back Mark Walton was arrested late Friday on a charge of mis ...

Friday was strange for Gino DiMare. It wasn’t because his whole family went out to the mound at Alex ...

One thing was obvious to Wayne Younger the first time he got his hands on Ladarius Tennison: The ath ...

Though it’s early, UM already has assembled an outstanding nine-member 2020 recruiting class, a grou ...

Three days before they open their season against the Rutgers Scarlet Knights, the Miami Hurricanes h ...

UM alumna Alina Mayo Azze, who has covered a myriad of topics during her 37-year career, has been a ...

Happiness and well-being scholar Tal Ben-Shahar is UM’s newest Distinguished Presidential Scholar. ...

The University of Miami will host the first symposium to explore LGBTQ human rights across the Ameri ...

UM experts react to a new ban that prohibits people in Key West from using certain types of sunscree ...

A matchmaker extraordinaire, Ricardo Cepeda, the manager of the UM Zebrafish Facility, is passionate ...

The University of Miami baseball team opened the Gino DiMare era with a record-setting victory over ...

The University of Miami women's swimming team put together 14 lifetime bests Saturday at its an ...

Game time is 6 p.m. in Chestnut Hill, Mass. ...

The No. 20 Miami women's basketball team will play its second top-five foe in a span of three g ...

Despite earning the doubles point, the No. 15 Miami women's tennis team dropped a 5-2 decision ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.