Opinion

EDITORIAL A cheer for Homecoming

Barring a certain Tiger encounter on Saturday, Homecoming this year was a pleasant surprise.

Last year in this page we criticized Homecoming for being exclusive, uneventful and poorly publicized, passing by largely unnoticed in the semester. We remained skeptical that effective changes would be implemented to improve the festivities.

However, the new Homecoming system established by the Homecoming Executive Committee [HEC] that made the celebration last one week instead of three succeeded in bringing more students and alumni together. A greater number of alumni attended Homecoming events because they all took place in one week, and that made the tradition more meaningful, since welcoming alumni is what Homecoming is supposed to be all about. They came with their kids and grandkids to the petting zoo and bumper cars during Hurricane Howl and mingled with students during the fireworks and parade.

Furthermore, because the HEC aggressively publicized Homecoming and scheduled the events closer together, more students participated in the celebrations than last year. Particularly on Friday night, the crowd can largely be attributed to the much-anticipated Wyclef Jean concert. Enthusiastic students praised the performance, so bringing a well known artist with popular college-age appeal proved to be smart move by the HEC, one they should keep in mind for future Homecomings.

Despite these highlights, some organizations that participated in the Homecoming competition complained, as we expected, that they lost events because of the new point system that divides organizations by their membership numbers rather than by their Greek or non-Greek status. Yet, we dismiss most of these complaints because, as we’ve said in the past, the competition should not be the focal point of Homecoming. We found that the new system still allowed organizations to compete on a relatively even playing field and still encouraged friendly rivalries to thrive. Moreover, sororities and fraternities endured a tough reality-check as two non-Greek organizations, Federaci

November 9, 2004

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

If he hasn’t made it already, Miami Hurricanes coach Mark Richt has a defining decision to ponder in ...

They were way below the radar coming into the 1983 season. And after their 28-3 opening-game loss to ...

In the opening eight minutes on Saturday — and the final seven minutes — FIU looked like a team that ...

The N’Kosi Perry era is here. Whether it’s here to stay is yet to be seen. The fans got what they wa ...

Ten takeaways from UM’s 31-17 win against FIU on Saturday at Hard Rock Stadium: ▪ Credit Mark Richt ...

Get Out The Vote, a nonpartisan initiative headed by the Division of Student Affairs and the Butler ...

University of Miami Libraries commemorates Banned Books Week with a special event and display. ...

A year after UPup’s founding father met his match, the service club is realizing its goal of becomin ...

UM students, faculty and staff commemorated the five-year anniversary of the Donna E. Shalala Studen ...

Miami’s Turnover Chain inspires copycats, but the U’s turnover prop has a ‘cool factor.’ ...

The Miami Hurricanes were one of the biggest risers in both major polls released Sunday, jumping to ...

The University of Miami volleyball program defeated Duke, 3-1, winning its fourth straight match and ...

Estela Perez-Somarriba of the Miami women's tennis team earned one of the most prestigious coll ...

The season-opening, three-day Miami Fall Invite wrapped up Sunday at the Neil Schiff Tennis Center a ...

N'Kosi Perry and a dominant Miami defense led the Hurricanes to a 31-17 victory over the Panthe ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.