Opinion

EDITORIAL So much for ‘sisterhood’

Sorority rush lived up to its stereotype of pettiness this year as one-seventh of the women that applied to be members of a sorority were not offered a bid.

In the past, the University of Miami’s six sororities evenly split the number of women rushing, which meant that every woman got at least one offer to join an organization. This year, with the addition of Alpha Delta Pi (ADPi), the sororities split the number of women seven ways. This would normally make sense, except that ADPi did not take part in the formal rush – it has a rush of its own later this week – which means that on bid day, one-seventh of the total number of women that rushed did not get bids.

Recruitment was organized this way in order to make sure that there were enough women rushing for ADPi. The glitch, however, was that women rushing that were interested in ADPi had been provided with the opportunity to opt out of the formal rush for the remaining six sororities. In other words, women that wanted to join one of the original six sororities (Delta Delta Delta, Delta Gamma, Delta Phi Epsilon, Kappa Kappa Gamma, Sigma Delta Tau and Zeta Tau Alpha) were not allowed to do so. And, although this system was explained to the women rushing, it was unclear, leaving many of them feeling inadequate, left out and disappointed at rush’s end.

If these “leftover” women are still interested in Greek life – unlikely, given how they have been treated – they will have to settle for rushing for ADPi, a sorority that was quite possibly not among their first choices.

Of course, the recruitment method succeeded in that ADPi is sure to fill its member quota. However, will the women that rush for ADPi do so because they really want to be a part of the organization, or will they view ADPi as some sort of consolation prize?

Whether the blame lies on the Panhellenic Council, the Dean of Students Office or ADPi, sorority recruitment this year created a system that left women inconsolable, heartbroken and feeling unwanted. Rather than allocating a fixed percentage of women to the organization, the system should have made ADPi earn its members and allowed the women whose first choices were the other six sororities, to rush for them. If ADPi ended up with fewer members, it would have been acceptable, given that it is new on campus.

It is precisely events like this year’s mismanaged rush that make others look down upon Greek life. By leaving out women and making them feel useless and unimportant, this year’s recruitment made it seem like sororities are, in fact, about cliques and stereotypes – if you don’t fit their pattern, look and dress code, you will be discarded.

Hopefully, the so-called leftovers that will join ADPi will steer clear of the exclusion that has characterized other sororities in the past.

September 20, 2004

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Eleven football seasons ago, after the Miami Hurricanes and FIU Panthers met at the Orange Bowl for ...

University of Miami fans no doubt are loving the Hurricanes’ two newest tight ends. What they’re pro ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Thursday: ▪ Though UM wasn’t called for a single penalty against ...

Two of the best athletes and a freshman quarterback on the No. 21 University of Miami football team ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Wednesday: ▪ The Miami Hurricanes are honoring their 1983 nation ...

Get Out The Vote, a nonpartisan initiative headed by the Division of Student Affairs and the Butler ...

University of Miami Libraries commemorates Banned Books Week with a special event and display. ...

A year after UPup’s founding father met his match, the service club is realizing its goal of becomin ...

UM students, faculty and staff commemorated the five-year anniversary of the Donna E. Shalala Studen ...

Miami’s Turnover Chain inspires copycats, but the U’s turnover prop has a ‘cool factor.’ ...

The Miami Hurricanes volleyball program won its third straight match in 3-0 fashion on Friday night ...

Estela Perez-Somarriba of the Miami women's tennis team registered two straight-set wins Friday ...

It's been over a decade since they last met, but Miami and FIU are set to renew their crosstown ...

The University of Miami cross country team gears up to compete in its third meet of the season this ...

University of Miami Director of Athletics Blake James announced Friday a five-year contract extensio ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.