Opinion

U.S. needs to learn how to play fair in trade talks

The game of Risk has it all: my very own impenetrable army of loyal followers, a map featuring great nations like Irkutsk, and most importantly, the chance to become Supreme Dictator of the World. Honestly, I can’t see why I haven’t tried world domination for real. Then I remember my impenetrable army is made out of plastic units. Perhaps it is for the best because I’ve found that when commanding my army of plastic units, I am more likely to make otherwise suicidal decisions, such as attacking others even if it actually hurts me worse. Oddly, when it comes to regulating the global marketplace, the same sort of strategy is being applied to actual people as well as plastic units.

Judging by the events of the past conference of the World Trade Oraganization in Cancun, there isn’t much of a distinction. In theory, free trade is a good thing because it should provide growth all around as everyone involved has more markets in which to sell their goods. The problem is that almost all the countries involved in the WTO want to tweak the theory to make it only go one way, so that they receive all the benefits without the risks. To a degree, I can understand why poorer countries feel the need to approach free trade cautiously, but I cannot understand why the E.U. and U.S. are so insistent on, for example, spending billions to subsidize industries that aren’t able to meet market prices. Neither wants to get rid of their subsidies first because then one has a huge advantage over the other. Moreover, in the U.S., both Democrats and Republicans have their own interests in keeping subsidies. So each administration promises to make them more efficient, but you know how that goes. In the meantime, trade doesn’t get any freer or fairer.

While hoping that the many countries of the WTO will suddenly agree is a bit naOve, I fear that the US will continue to apply its strategy across the board. As talks concerning the Free Trade Area of the Americas loom, I can only hope the U.S. will make every attempt to play fair.

Elaine Ayo can be contacted at eayo@umsis.miami.edu.

October 7, 2003

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Pro Football Focus unveiled where Power 5 programs rank in tackles for a loss or no gain against the ...

A six-pack of Hurricanes notes on a Thursday evening: ▪ UM coach Mark Richt has explained his decisi ...

Braylen Ingraham’s final college visit before decision day took him just about as far from home as p ...

The Miami Hurricanes had traveled half the field to start the second half when coach Mark Richt enco ...

Jeremiah Payton was one of those prospects the Miami Hurricanes coveted from just about the time he ...

UM’s annual Food Day celebration will highlight the need to eat sustainable, locally sourced foods ...

University of Miami changes program title of Women’s and Gender Studies to Gender and Sexuality Stud ...

Two families with deep ties to Miami—the Millers and Fains— celebrate two endowed faculty chair appo ...

The University of Miami remembers alumnus Erik Hauri—the man who discovered water on the moon. ...

Through an innovative program, Miami Law students are empowering local high schoolers to think like ...

The Miami women's tennis team turned in a strong showing Saturday at the ITA Southeast Regional ...

The University of Miami soccer team closes out action in the Tar Heel state with a match against thi ...

The Miami women's tennis team opened play Friday at the ITA Southeast Regional Championships Pr ...

The Miami Hurricanes fell in their tri-meet with Georgia Tech and Notre Dame Saturday afternoon, dro ...

The University of Miami women's swimming & diving team impressed in its quad-meet Friday af ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.