Opinion

It’s time to stop pretending that France is a friend

France is not our friend.
It can be stated no simpler than that. For as long as I can remember, despite claiming to be our ally, France has nevertheless acted in a publicly hostile way towards the United States. Reminding them of the thousands of Americans, who twice in the last century shed blood and died on French battlefields in order to keep France free, only seems to embolden their resentment. It’s as if for a Frenchman to recollect that his nation had to have its ass pulled out of the fire twice because of its own incompetence is akin to claiming that he’s child molester or something.
Experts familiar with those, as the National Review’s Jonah Goldberg so eloquently put it, “cheese-eating surrender monkeys,” say that this continued French predilection for opposing us is merely their way of demanding the respect that they believe they are entitled. Entitled would seem to hit the mark here, since they certainly haven’t done anything to earn anyone’s respect. Of course, they would probably bring up their assistance to us in the Revolutionary War . . . as if World War I and II never happened.
Certainly, if the French don’t believe there should be a war in Iraq, I can respect that. Obviously, they aren’t alone or in the minority on that position. However, where I draw the line is in their public statements not only in opposing the US position, but also in stating that they will actively work against us. A friend doesn’t do that. A friend sits down with you and discusses or argues it with you – in private, not on TV. A friend doesn’t tell the whole world that they’re going to vote against you in the UN Security Council. Of course, how in the hell a nation that surrendered in World War II got a permanent seat on the Security Council is another question.
We should recognize this new reality by severing any defense agreements with France and calling them what they are – an adversary. They clearly hate our guts and the feeling is certainly mutual with many Americans. It’s time to end the relevance subsidy we’ve given them for over fifty years so they can finally descend into the irrelevancy that they have so richly earned.

Scott Wacholtz is a senior majoring in Computer Science.

February 4, 2003

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The Miami Hurricanes started the season No. 8 nationally in both major polls. Now, they’re nowhere t ...

With a bye week on the horizon, the meager University of Miami offense has nearly two weeks to attem ...

As bleak as it seems now for the University of Miami, the Canes can still take a repeat trip to Char ...

A half dozen takeaways from UM’s demoralizing 16-13 loss at Virginia on Saturday: ▪ As was the case ...

So, who’s the quarterback now? The No. 16 Miami Hurricanes came to Charlottesville on Saturday with ...

Home Truth, the story of Jessica Lenahan’s pursuit of more effective domestic violence laws, screene ...

Members of the UM community who want to donate to relief efforts for those impacted by Hurricanes Mi ...

The University of Miami’s Model UN is working to expand its membership and reputation with its first ...

During a keynote address at a conference in Los Angeles, entrepreneurial heavyweight Magic Leap anno ...

A colorless, odorless gas used by a UM scientist to study ocean currents helps save his vision. ...

The Miami Hurricanes volleyball team improved to 10-5, 6-2 in the ACC, with a 3-0 sweep of Boston Co ...

The Miami women's tennis team closed the Bedford Cup with a perfect day, winning each match in ...

Playing in front of a boisterous home crowd, the University of Miami soccer team earned a, 1-1, draw ...

The Hurricanes fell in their ACC road opener to the Virginia Cavaliers. ...

The Canes have won five straight games and are 2-0 in the ACC, but they know they have a tough road ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.