Opinion

Stale bagels and moldy cheese = domestic goddess

Hmmm. I will step forward as one of the first students to publicly announce my conversion to domestic societal standards. Yes! Chartwells has officially created an impulse to cook within me, therefore initiating my progression toward becoming a “fit” wife and “fit” mother. Never in a million years would I have ever skipped to the supermarket and the kitchen to happily whip up a whole meal. Thanks to Chartwells experiences, they have promoted the better way of life – fresh food.
When I created my first pan of baked macaroni this past week, I leapt for joy. Not only did I know that my dinner did not consist of part of yesterday’s lunch, but I knew that my macaroni would not taste like soap (something I had to wash my mouth out with after tasting Chartwells’ macaroni).
Thanks to Chartwells’ mystery meals and beverages that have an unfortunate aftertaste, I have left behind lukewarm soups, stale bagels, moldy cheese and hot sliced peaches to pursue my societal role in the house. I am prepared to happily fix edible, fresh meals under the cost of ten dollars and have food left over for a week.
No more waiting in line for the “good stuff,” no more waiting for another batch of half-wilted lettuce or hard spaghetti noodles, and best of all, no more holding air in just to throw a tray on to the belt heading into a foul-smelling abyss – no, not since I have moved up in the world (shocking my mother, who always pitied my lack of interest in cooking skills).
Thanks to Chartwells I have even given up boxed and frozen meals, opting for an even higher level of freshness.
Sure, I may have to sacrifice a movie or two to receive a decent meal, but I realize that if I want to keep my intestines for the remainder of my life, or if I want to keep my love of eating, or if I want to be semi-prepared for the “real world,” I may actually have to bust out an old cookbook and call home for directions.
So I can almost guarantee for anyone who “converts,” even if you can’t boil water or even turn on the stove for that matter, that you will probably have a more digestible meal if you cook – that is if you don’t already love Chartwells.

Marquita K. Bell is a sophomore majoring in print journalism and political science.

November 19, 2002

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published in print every Tuesday.