Edge

Letter to the Editor

“To be or not to be” credible, that is the question. Are we a credible actor on the world stage if we sign resolutions that we don’t enforce, especially when those subject to their jurisdiction blatantly ignore them? We know by their actions that the UN has no credibility and is rapidly morphing into its predecessor, the League of Nations. I am given to wonder, then, why it is so important to Mr. Travis Atria what the rest of the world thinks of us since we’re in this mess with Iraq now because we signed on to this incompetent notion of multilateralism that left Saddam Hussein in place.
Mr. Atria would have us believe that this rogue state of Iraq is deserving of the respectful diplomatic discourse under which reasonable nations conduct themselves. It most certainly is not. In light of this, we are no more accusing Iraq of a crime they have not committed than Winston Churchill was guilty of falsely accusing Hitler of criminal acts as he brazenly defied the treaty of Versailles. While I do not imply that George W. Bush is a man of Winston Churchill’s level of greatness, I simply point out that most of the nations involved considered Churchill to be wrong in the same manner that those of Mr. Atria’s stripe consider President Bush to be wrong.
Freedom of speech is a wonderful thing, even speech as biased as Mr. Atria’s. I wore the uniform of a United States Marine for seven years to protect that right and I am always gratified to see its mature and articulate expression. It is important to the functioning of a democracy such as ours that all points of view are expressed. It is, however, not productive to base your opposition to something or someone based upon how eloquent a public speaker someone is or is not. There was a man once who was a great crafter of the written word. His ideas touched many and led to the foundations of our government. So imagine what a shock it was to people when they came to see him and found out he was an absolutely awful public speaker, probably in his own way much worse than George W. Bush. This man subsequently was our third President. It’s probably good his fitness to lead wasn’t judged by Travis Atria.

Scott Wacholtz is a junior majoring in computer science and political science who served as a Marine Corps Sergeant in Desert Storm.

October 1, 2002

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.