Opinion

Stay sober and dance all night long

I recently visited Level in South Beach and had one of the best times of my life. And believe it or not, it did not involve a drop of alcohol or any kind of substance.

It was all about the music. True, that’s a testament to resident trance DJ George Acosta, who happened to be spinning this particular night. But it was also about the people, the atmosphere and the energy pulsating in the club.

People go out dancing to have a good time, but when you’re lucky enough to find a place with music so intense and loud, you start to go crazy and lose all your inhibitions. Sounds familiar, right?

I’ve heard about the phenomenon that music can have on people; how it can stir up this primitive and emotional response in us which people have compared to intoxication. It’s that elusive thing we all know as the “natural high,” and I think I discovered it that night. Nothing else mattered the whole time. I didn’t care who was around me, or about not having enough money to buy drinks, or how much of an ass I was making of myself on the dance floor.

I closed my eyes, threw my hands up, and let the music flow. My whole body ached after awhile, but I didn’t care.

I remember thinking that night that this is what it’s all about. Life should be all about this intensity and complete sensory overload.

Of course, that was then, and I know there are many more important things than that, but I still think everyone should strive to have something like this at least once in his or her life. It doesn’t have to mean dancing all night at Level. It could be anything that makes you feel like you’re so alive and you could never go to sleep.

If you’re someone who loves any kind of music, then you know what I’m talking about. Whether it be hip-hop, trance, Latin, house, rock, retro, or any of the abundant types of music that you can find in South Florida, seek out your favorite. Even though your body will be hurting, your soul will thank you in the morning.

Derek Bramble is a senior majoring in broadcast journalism and theater.

September 17, 2002

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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