News

Mother of rape victim warns of dangers

Kristin Cooper was a sophomore in college when she came home for winter break in 1995. On New Year’s Eve, her parents, Andrea and Mike, went out to a party. When they got home, they found her laying in the living room, Alanis Morrissette’s “You Oughtta Know” booming from the speakers. She wasn’t breathing.

When Andrea leaned in to check for a pulse, she saw a gun between Kristin’s legs and a pool of blood behind her body. She was dead.

Mike and Andrea thought Kristin had killed herself because of a bad breakup a few months before. They didn’t find out the truth until the next day, when a police detective reported what he had found in Kristin’s journal: she had been raped, and had been suffering from clinical depression.

This was the story Andrea Cooper brought to the Flamingo Ballroom on Wednesday night. “Kristin’s Story,” her lecture about rape and depression, brought to light not only her daughter’s story, but opened venues for other sexual assault victims to seek help.

“It was amazing. She’s a very strong woman,” said Lucy Evans, a junior who attended the talk. “It was very encouraging; very comforting.”

“It’s a topic we really haven’t covered well enough on campus,” said Jennifer Brack, Assistant Director of Business Services.

The lecture covered options for victims of rape and depression, information for friends and family, as well as various contact numbers, books and websites. Cooper also gave warning signs of clinical depression and what friends and family can and should do to help.

“The things she said were very applicable with the situation here at UM,” said Mike Johnston, member of Pi Kappa Alpha. “She was very honest, very open and very sincere.

“I really think the University should endorse more programs like this for a lot more topics.”

Andrea Cooper began “Kristin’s Story” in 1998 as a way to help cope with her loss. Since then, she has spoken to over 50,000 college students. The National Offices of Delta Delta Delta and Alpha Chi Omega, Andrea’s and Kristin’s sororities, respectively, pay for ten annual talks on college campuses all over the country.

“I’ve been waiting two years for this,” Brack said. “I was thrilled we had this experience tonight.”

With a nearly full room, most people were very satisfied by Cooper’s information. However, this was not the case for all the attendees.

“It was probably most helpful to people who were not victims or didn’t know anything,” said Stacey Seigel, a junior.

“I thought there were a lot of issues she didn’t address,” said Kelly Spear, a sophomore.

March 22, 2002

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

The University of Miami has joined forces with a national collaborative to help raise awareness and ...

Political scientist Calla Hummel, who was in Bolivia during its flawed election, shares her insights ...

University of Miami Frost School of Music alumni are recognized on Latin music’s biggest night—the 2 ...

A new course is providing students a primer on planning the Super Bowl, one of the biggest events of ...

A week full of spirit, friendly competition and ’Canes pride was on display during Homecoming and Al ...

It started as a large, plain white wall. It's become a conversation piece. ...

The Hurricanes continue their non-conference homestand on Sunday, November 17 when they host the IUP ...

Miami volleyball forced its third straight five-set match on Friday against NC State, but fell short ...

 Dylan Sykes and Emma Langlois, leaders of the Miami cross county program, concluded the 2019 season ...

Following a win in its first road game of the season, the Miami men's basketball team will resu ...

TMH Twitter
About Us

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Florida. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published in print every Tuesday.