News

Students feel safe studying abroad

Although fears of international terrorism and reduced airline safety are keeping many tourists and businesspeople out of the skies and holding them reclusive in their homelands, UM students feel little or no apprehension about traveling abroad next semester, and studying in a foreign university.

At pre-departure orientation sessions last Wednesday and Thursday, Study Abroad directors instructed prospective travelers in the financial matters, deadlines, health precautions, and safety issues connected with international travel. Students were educated on how to facilitate issues corresponding with departure, residence, and return.

During the meeting, employees from the International Education and Exchange Programs Office discussed the importance of blending in, of looking natural while in a foreign country—basically, not looking American.

An article titled “Yes, I’m American. How Did You Guess” was handed out. The most informative line: “To the skittish tourist: Nikes and fanny packs are a giveaway”.

Lecturers also stressed the necessity of dressing, speaking, eating and gesturing like the natives.

They urged students to understand the nuances of the new worlds they will be living in, and taught them how to assimilate the neccessary traits.

Officials were prepared to pacify students’ anxieties concerning international tension, but a lack of worry surprised everyone.

“I just wanted a break from Miami,” said Andrew, a student traveling to Australia.

When asked if he was apprehensive about living across the world for four months, he calmly replied, “I’m a little bit worried, but I’m more worried about going to New York for Thanksgiving, than anything else.”

Alex, traveling to Switzerland, declared he has “no concern whatsoever” for the media’s over-dramatization of foreign tension.

“A lot of people brought it up, but it never really bothered me much at all.”

Another Australia-bound student, Brooke, broke the silence.

“My parents were petrified! But they’ve been prepared for a while,” she acknowledged.

“They were a little scared before [September 11th], but now . . . they’re not scared about flying, they’re just scared about the other people.”

All the students were in consensus that their fears for their own safety in another country were barely affected by terrorist activities.

“My only concern would be about what would happen over here,” added Michelle, soon to be studying in a university in Switzerland, suggesting her uneasiness with leaving her family and friends behind in a land she feels may not be safe for them.

A general murmur of agreement in the room signified a common theme: their worries lie within the well-being of the ones they love, right at home in the US.

November 20, 2001

Reporters

The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

At their best, they are UM’s most dynamic players on each side of the ball. But the Ahmmon Richards ...

A day after practicing in the Carol Soffer Football Indoor Practice Facility for the first time in s ...

It appears that at least one LSU receiver won’t be available at the University of Miami football ope ...

After the Miami Hurricanes football team spent part of its practice on Monday in a torrential downpo ...

Nothing like a comic book cover on steroids to get University of Miami and LSU football fans juiced ...

Intergroup Dialogue, soon to be offered as a course, fosters a sense of belonging, an appreciation f ...

Aretha Franklin and her music defined “what is soul” to generations of music lovers. ...

The University of Miami kicked into high gear to welcome thousands of new students and ensure move-i ...

UM President Julio Frenk welcomes first-year and transfer students to UM in signature ’Cane Kickoff ...

Miami Law conducts its inaugural Legal Impact Hack for first-year students. ...

The University of Miami volleyball team won its exhibition match over FIU, 3-0, Saturday at the Knig ...

Coming off a road win in its season opener, the University of Miami soccer team will welcome crossto ...

In head coach Sarah Barnes' debut at the helm, the University of Miami soccer team won its seas ...

The Hurricanes practiced in the Carol Soffer Indoor Practice Facility for the first time ever on Fri ...

Malik Rosier, Travis Homer and Ahmmon Richards are key returning playmakers, but they are just the b ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.