Opinion

Don’t let bookstore extort you

As we approach the second semester, the thought of buying books again looms on the horizon. I remember a few months ago standing in line, hoping to God I would not have to drop classes that required plastic-wrapped books.

As I laid three new Spanish books on the counter, the total reached $500. I then winced as $109 more were added to my total.

As I walked out of the bookstore, a warning sign on the wall caught my eye: “Unwrapped books cannot be sold back.”

Naturally, I felt a pang of fear when I opened the books a few days later to do some homework.

Soon, I was instructed by my advisor to drop the class. Taking the brand new books to the store, I asked if there was anything they could do for me. The told me my only options were to keep the books or sell them back to the bookstore for merely peanuts.

It is simply not fair that I should pay so much money and then receive less than ten percent of the original price when I try to sell the unused books back. Spurred by my disillusionment, I searched online for the books to check how badly I had been cheated. I found the very same books for half the price, shipping and handling included.

While there may not be much we can do to change the prices of the bookstore, I strongly urge students to find their books elsewhere. Do not succumb to such unfairness again.

There is no excuse for such extortion, and I for one demand action on the part of the administration.

Travis Atria is a sophomore majoring in English literature.

November 20, 2001

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The Miami Hurricane

Student newspaper at the University of Miami


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The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.