Edge, Ultra

Ultra implements new item restrictions

For those who live in Miami, the commotion and excitement surrounding Ultra Music Festival is just a regular occurrence at Bayfront Park.  As the biggest music festival in North America, Ultra, now in its 17th year, has attracted thousands upon thousands of tourists, spring breakers and music lovers.

For all the people in one area, sometimes the excitement can get out of hand. This year Ultra is instituting more regulations and prohibiting more items after undergoing pressure to increase safety measures. The latest changes include enforcing an 18 and up age limit, as well as banning traditional festival paraphernalia such as glow sticks, pacifiers, face masks and non-transparent bags .

VCJUM070326

“Consistent with our commitment to improve every year, Ultra is conducting a top-to-bottom review of the security procedures and measures to assess where we can add even more security for next year’s event,” said festival officials in a press release last year.

This action was prompted by several tragic incidents over the last few years. One case was the fatal drug overdose of a 21-year-old in 2014.

Another was the trampling of 29-year-old security guard Erica Mack. Mack sustained potentially fatal injuries to her skull and leg under a falling gate after a large group of gate-crashers rushed a weak point in the fence surrounding the venue and trampled her. She was in critical condition when she was taken to the hospital.

During the last two years, both Mayor Tomas Regalado and City Commissioner Marc Sarnoff, along with a hefty group of supporters, attempted to relocate the famous electronic dance music (EDM) festival from Bayfront Park. According to CBS, Sarnoff stated that the festival has a high potential for violence, drug use and general debauchery. In the end, the commissioner called the money made from the festival “blood money” and attempted to find a way to formally move it out of Bayfront Park.

The movement was taken to a vote, and it lost 4-1, keeping the now 17-year-old music festival going strong.

In response to this pressure, and for the general safety of the over 150,000 attendees, Ultra has some new safety changes in policy regulations officially posted on their website.

While previous years also technically had a strict security system and policy, it seems like more is being done this year.

No backpacks are allowed, with the exception of hydration bags (like CamelBaks) and see-through bags. No containers will be allowed, even if they are for hydration as well. There will also be no face masks or totems allowed.

The festival will begin implementing a zero tolerance for drug and drug paraphernalia. Ultra has stated that they will be having undercover cops both in and around the large venue in downtown Miami. The number of security working the festival has increased by an average of 75 personnel a year during the last four years, but this year will probably have more than 300 people working security in total.

According to a Facebook post made by Ultra Music Festival, “We are privileged to create over 1,800 direct jobs in our community and bring over $80 million in economic impact to our local economy.”

March 25, 2015

Reporters

Marwan Alenezi


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Either the Miami Hurricanes get a collective adrenaline rush from heart-palpitating fourth quarters, ...

View photos from the Syracuse at Miami game Saturday, Oct. 21, 2017, at Hard Rock Stadium in Miami G ...

CANESFAN SATISFACTION METER: G6: Time again for the latest installment of the Canesfan Satisfaction ...

Syracuse student writer Matthew Gutierrez of The Daily Orange asked me to answer some of his questio ...

After this past University of Miami football game, coach Mark Richt said the crowd came alive during ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

Syracuse visits Miami on Saturday, October 21st at Hard Rock Stadium. ...

Thirty years ago, the 1987 Hurricanes achieved perfection. This weekend they are back where it all b ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

Behind a historic performance from senior Olga Strantzali, the University of Miami volleyball team b ...

The Miami women's tennis team opened play Friday at the ITA Southeast Regional Championships Pr ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.