Opinion, Pro/Con

CON: Focus on future, leave past documents behind

An anonymous newsletter on the Stanford University campus uncovered the key to the treasure trove of college admissions: students can request their college admissions files under the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA). According to FOX News Online, an estimated 1,000 students at Stanford University have already begun the process.

Students are left almost in the dark about the entire admissions process, so their curiosity is certainly piqued about why they were accepted, but it is not necessary for them to see the files.

Many students faced difficult decisions and crushed self-esteems throughout the college admissions process. Even if students were accepted, seeing their files revives the past, when they should be moving forward toward the future. Students are already at the University of Miami; they’ve made their decision. Instead of reopening wounds and grudges, they should focus on how they can enjoy their time at the university and utilize the innumerable tools UM provides to improve their futures.

Furthermore, if admissions officers had been too candid in their comments, viewing them now could cause students distress. You’ve certainly heard the age-old saying, “If you don’t have anything nice to say, then don’t say anything at all.” However, in doing their jobs, admissions officers may not practice that same gentle discretion. Admissions officers have students’ GPAs, grades and essays, but really don’t know each student individually. While students may hope to better themselves and improve their skills by viewing the files, the files will most likely provide less insight than they hoped.

Lastly, if this process becomes more common, admission officers may begin to exclude information from files out of the fear that students may see them. If students begin to utilize the FERPA to gain access to admission files, it could lead to an amendment to the act in order to protect the admissions process or a change in how admissions officers approach the process.

After all, it isn’t until we find the holes or ways to interpret laws to our advantage that they begin to change. Admissions officers may become uncomfortable speaking candidly or including all the information in the files. This causes inefficiency in the admissions process since these files are used as a place to record notes, and admissions officers can’t possibly remember every detail about the thousands of student applicants.

So, will you be requesting your files?

Alyssa Jacobson is a senior majoring in advertising and political science.

See Also: Jackie Yang’s PRO piece, “Transparency may benefit prospective college students”

March 18, 2015

Reporters

Alyssa Jacobson


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Shakey Rodriguez, the Miami high school basketball coaching legend, vividly remembers the first time ...

It was a good day for the Miami Hurricanes basketball team. They moved up to No. 6 in the AP Top 25 ...

Erykah Davenport and Shaneese Bailey made key plays back-to-back late in the game and four players s ...

1. MARLINS: Jeter's Fish trade Gordon. Stanton next?: While others spend -- like the Angels to ...

Five years and two days after being fired as FIU’s football coach, at least one report declares form ...

William W. Sandler Jr. Center for Alcohol and Other Drug Education earns national recognition for it ...

Retired baseball star Alex Rodriguez gives "Major League" advice to UM’s fall graduating c ...

Becoming the Man of the Hour ...

Always a little bit of a flair for the dramatic. ...

A scholarship created by retired Major League Baseball star Alex Rodriguez and born out of his love ...

The University of Miami women's basketball team capped its seven-game homestand with a 79-31 wi ...

University of Miami senior wide receiver Braxton Berrios earned 2017 first-team 2017 CoSIDA Academic ...

The Hurricanes and Colonials square off at noon Saturday in Washington, D.C. ...

University of Miami men's basketball player Chris Stowell is an active member in the Hurricanes ...

Eighteen Hurricane student-athletes graduated from four schools and colleges at the University of Mi ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.