Opinion

Break, and make, habits this Lent

Chances are, you’ve already picked something to give up for Lent. But for those of you that haven’t, listen up. This year, rather than go back to your usual sacrifices of chocolate or Facebook, use Lent as an opportunity to start a new habit.

Instead of trying to give up something you enjoy, and will probably indulge in at least once during Lent, why not take the time to do something better for yourself, your family or the environment?

The idea behind Lent is to “fast,” or give up something for 40 days; ideally cutting out distractions and refocusing on what’s most important in your life. In our modern age, Lent has developed into a period where people give up some sort of vice during its span.

This idea of “giving up” something can easily be applied to giving up something negative in your life, and thereby gaining something that will stay with you long after Lent is over.

It doesn’t have to be a big change; you could decide to give up buying bottled water in exchange for reusable water bottles, thereby lessening your environmental footprint. Or maybe you’ve been struggling to quit smoking, and Lent is the perfect opportunity to give it another shot.

Even trying to curb your judgmental instincts, or any other negative outlooks could be your path to a more effective Lent experience.

The beauty of this kind of “fast” is that what you learn during your 40 days can contribute to your lasting health and happiness, but you’re still stepping out of your comfort zone to give up something that is currently a part of your life.

The point is that Lent doesn’t have to be a burden, and you don’t have to give up something that is important to your daily life. Instead, you can give up something that you might not even miss, and ultimately develop healthier habits in the process.

Amanda Wood is a senior majoring in ecosystem science and policy.

February 27, 2015

Reporters

Amanda Wood


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

There were indications, even before Lonnie Walker IV was selected No. 18 by the San Antonio Spurs in ...

Add another player to the Miami Hurricanes' 2019 recruiting class. Defensive end Jahfari Harvey ...

From the onset, the Miami Hurricanes' plan was for the Carol Soffer football indoor practice fa ...

Gino DiMare on Tuesday stood in a spot that two men before him had crafted into a pinnacle of succes ...

The NBA Draft is on Thursday, and the buzz around the league is that the University of Miami’s Lonni ...

Teachers tackle challenging questions at the Holocaust Studies Summer Institute. ...

A University of Miami lecturer explores the role of the front porch in black communities. ...

In the aftermath of Hurricane Maria, two public health sciences students traveled to Puerto Rico to ...

Colder Atlantic temperatures could change hurricane season forecasts, but the trend isn't expec ...

UM neurorehabilitation expert David S. Kushner, M.D., who helps modern patients recover from brain s ...

Walker picked 18th overall by San Antonio Spurs, Brown 42nd by Detroit Pistons. ...

The University of Miami women's golf team had three individuals selected to the 2018 Atlantic C ...

NBA Draft will be held Thursday evening in Brooklyn. ...

Haley Templeton is set to travel to Detroit, Mich., on Friday to train and compete with the U.S. Wom ...

First-year Miami head soccer coach Sarah Barnes released Wednesday the team's schedule for the ...

TMH Twitter
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.