Opinion

7-Eleven gets nutritious makeover

7-Eleven’s image over the years has come to feature large Slurpees and rows of potato chip bags loaded with refined sugars and void of any nutritional value. However, change is on the horizon.

In Los Angeles, the company has partnered with fitness guru and creator of P90X Tony Horton to introduce healthier options to gas station shelves. By providing travelers access to options such as quinoa salad with chimichurri dressing and fresh pressed juices, the partnership is redirecting the fast food stigma toward a positive direction.

This transformation has not been met without skepticism. Critics of the approach have indicated that this modification of products will not prevent shoppers from purchasing the cinnamon roll in the adjacent aisle, nor would it be reasonable to spend $7 on a sandwich when one can buy four Doritos Loaded for $2.

Doubt also surrounds Horton’s credibility, namely his lack of qualifications in the field of nutrition.

Yet the demand for nutritious foods remains prevalent. 7-Eleven reports that sales of bananas far exceed sales of Snickers bars, and with increased competition from Starbucks and Dunkin’ Donuts, which now offer healthier to-go options, 7-Eleven needs to modify its approach to maintain its edge.

Furthermore, by partnering with an individual like Tony Horton, creator of Tony Horton Kitchen, a service that delivers healthy meals right to the front door, 7-Eleven has increased its customer base and success rate.

With a more personable, well-known and passionate voice that America has already allowed into its living rooms, 7-Eleven’s revitalized approach to wholesome options has been met with resonating positivity. In the 104 L.A. locations where this new system is being tested, consumers are thrilled with the direction 7-Eleven is heading.

Faizah Shareef is a senior majoring in exercise physiology.

In a country with increasing rates of diabetes, obesity and nutritional deficiencies, 7-Eleven, in partnership with the strong voice of Tony Horton, has decided to make a difference.

By making health simple, understandable and accessible, it is making progress against these preventable diseases. Although it may take some time for this revolution to take hold across the nation, 7-Eleven has amped up its nutritional portfolio and is ready to bring it to the next level.

Faizah Shareef is a senior majoring in exercise physiology.

November 5, 2014

Reporters

Faizah Shareef


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