Edge, Music

Neon Trees colors Fort Lauderdale

Neon Trees is a band that formed in Utah back in 2005. Since 2005, the band has come a long way from having hits on the radio, television shows and even films.

The band stopped at Revolution Live in Fort Lauderdale on May 29 as part of its 2014 Pop Psychology Tour. A set full of outfit changes and catchy songs had the crowd jumping and jamming throughout the entire concert.

As the audience waited for Neon Trees to come on stage and perform, a white sheet covered the stage, creating an anxious atmosphere. Once the band opened with “Lessons in Love (All Day, All Night),” the sheet was ripped aside, revealing the band members dressed in bright neon colors.

After the band played “Your Surrender,” they took a break so lead singer Tyler Glenn could talk about love in this century. Glenn indirectly talked about the dating mobile app, Tinder, which had the audience laughing, grinning and blushing. His talk led into the band’s cleverly titled song, “Love In the 21st Century.”

The next song was the band’s hit song, “Animal,” which was on the radio for most of 2010 and gave them their first number one song on a Billboard chart. The band gave its all for this pop rock song and the audience danced and cheered along.

Like many passionate lead singers, Glenn connected with the audience by singing his heart out, crowd surfing and touching hands of screaming fans that were squeezed against the rails by the stage. He was passionate about every song performed, especially “I Love You (But I Hate Your Friends)” and “Don’t You Want Me,” a cover of the classic Human League song.

While performing “Don’t You Want Me” the microphone slipped out of Glenn’s hand into the abyss, which in this case is the space between the front rails and the stage. He rose to the occasion, kept his cool and still had the crowd dancing- something not everyone can pull off under the pressure of a full room.

As the show drew to a close, the crowd’s chants for “one more song” drew the band back out to perform a cover of “Where Is My Mind” by the Pixies followed by the band’s own 2012 hit “Everybody Talks.”

The set was filled with fun, upbeat songs and messages about love from Glenn, making it seem like an Indie pop love concert.

 

June 13, 2014

Reporters

Frank Malvar


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