Opinion

Apple wins in college

Apple and Samsung, the two rival tech firms of today, are battling for consumer loyalty in both the global marketplace and the courtroom.

Since Apple initiated litigation in spring 2011, both companies have released scores of products. Samsung has just released the Galaxy S5 smartphone, which serves to highlight the underlying ideological differences in the companies.

Some deplore Apple’s restrictions and lack of customizability, but I consider it an advantage. Overall, Samsung’s entire development strategy seems to model this principle: see something that’s working in the market, take the idea and try to make it cheaper and better.

While copying is by no means a new concept, it disrupts the integrity of the market and drives down quality. Samsung’s smartphones are loaded with unnecessary software and gimmicky features that are supposed to lure in customers but instead make their phones harder to use.

On the other hand, Apple has always prized originality from the point of view of the user. Apple designs with quality in mind, both inside and out, and consumers have indicated that this aspect of technology is important to them.

As an avid iPhone and Mac user, one might say that my unabashed support for Apple is biased. However, in the not-so-distant past, I was once an owner of PCs and a litany of Samsung products.

Comparatively, both experiences have put me on the side of our generation. Though the Android operating system takes up most of the market share worldwide, U.S. college students prefer iPhones by an overwhelming majority.

Regardless of which company you support, the only thing that remains clear is that the real winners between the two are the lawyers. Indeed, there have been so many trials and counter-suits that at the end of the day, nobody is looking out for the people who actually use the products.

Hopefully once the dust settles, the tech industry will return its focus to innovation rather than competition.

Ravi Jain is a freshman majoring in chemistry.

March 30, 2014

Reporters

Ravi Jain


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

When Al Golden recruited David Njoku to the University of Miami in 2014 the Cedar Grove, N.J. native ...

The night after FIU gave away a game to the University of Miami with a ninth-inning passed ball that ...

Redshirt freshman quarterback Jack Allison left the University of Miami football program on Tuesday. ...

Closer Frankie Bartow stared into the Panthers’ dugout immediately after fanning the final batter of ...

Go ahead. Try telling former University of Miami quarterback Brad Kaaya that his critics say he gets ...

UM marks Holocaust Remembrance Day with a reading of names and recollections of a survivor. ...

A recent paper argues that not only have researchers just scratched the surface of analyzing the Ama ...

The period of the first 100 days in office is a telling gauge for a president's full term in th ...

UM students, staff and faculty join the worldwide march to end men’s violence against women. ...

Greek Week at the University of Miami is committed to raising money and awareness for United Cerebra ...

The University of Miami men's tennis team came up short against No. 34 Duke University, 4-1, Th ...

Images from @CanesMensTennis win over Boston College. ...

Sinead Lohan and Estela Perez-Somarriba of the Miami women's tennis team were both among the ni ...

The fourth-seeded Miami women's tennis team is set to open ACC Championship play Friday afterno ...

Miami Hurricanes tight end David Njoku was selected with the 29th overall pick by the Cleveland Brow ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly on Thursdays during the regular academic year.