Opinion

Milkshake line must shorten

Since 1989, Mark Light shakes have been a staple at Hurricanes baseball games. For many students, attending a game is merely the intermediate step to an ultimate end – consuming a delectable milkshake.

But it has gotten to the point that obtaining a milkshake at a Hurricanes baseball game is more of a hassle than an enjoyable experience. With waits that can span three innings, the amount of time necessary to get a milkshake has become increasingly frustrating, especially with this year’s price increase from $5 to $6 per shake.

If the university wants to provide its fans with the best possible experience, changes must be implemented to expedite the process to purchase a milkshake.

Last spring, I brought my family to a baseball game against the University of Florida (UF). Between the family-friendly environment of Alex Rodriguez Park and the allure of creamy milkshakes, I assumed this would be a great way to spend quality family time. What I failed to anticipate was the fact that “family time” would include standing in the milkshake line from the end of the fifth inning until the last out of the game, while my family watched in the stands. When UF was once again in town last month, it was apparent that nothing had been done to resolve this issue.

Although waiting in line for a milkshake may be a novelty for those who have never dealt with the grueling wait, this indoctrination into the Miami baseball fan club has long lost its appeal. What is so disappointing about the milkshake line at baseball games is the fact that the solution is astoundingly simple.

If the Mark Light milkshake stand were to get a second register, a second soft-serve machine, and hire one or two more workers, I would venture that the wait time could easily be cut in half. This remedy would allow fans to see more of the actual game they came to watch.

Mark Light Shakes are an important aspect of the baseball fan experience, but they should add value to fan satisfaction, rather than detract from it. Fans should demand more from the milkshake line at Alex Rodriguez Park.

This starts with the university taking steps to improve the efficiency of the milkshake line, so that all can enjoy a shake in timely fashion.

 

Paul Ryan is a junior majoring in economics and finance.

 
March 19, 2014

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Paul Ryan


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