Opinion

Get friendly with Greeks

Sorority Facebook statuses have clogged your newsfeed every January since you’ve been at the University of Miami. Some of them may even have been yours. There’s the constant slew of girls obsessing over the new pledge class and new sisterhood, announcing how much they love their sisters and little or big.

Being in a Greek organization, I can see how non-Greeks can have a problem with our on-campus presence. The stigma of obsessing over partying and Starbucks, the cult-like atmosphere and the assumption that we see ourselves as better than other students can be obnoxious. On the other hand, Greeks are plenty sick of explaining the powerful friendships and successful philanthropic efforts that come out of it.

This has always bothered me, as my non-Greek friends have remained the same since joining my sorority. A person’s choice of organization should never dictate their relationships.

Going Greek has made my college experience that much better, but I will also never forget the friends that I made during orientation my freshman year. These friends may not have gone Greek, but the beauty of that is how little of a difference it makes.

Sure, I was slightly delusional and difficult to deal with over the past week of girl flirting that is recruitment, but my non-Greek roommates have accepted that this is what I love and have supported me through it. Although they may laugh at my chants and make fun of my obsession with my little, my roommates are the girls who have fed me and brought me candy at the end of those long days.

There are plenty of differences between Greeks and non-Greeks. However, the differences are infinitesimal. If you choose to ignore the negative attitude presented by the other side, you can understand that a Greek organization is nothing more than that—an organization. It is like any other club that anyone else is a part of.

So whether you’re Greek or not, don’t let it cloud your judgment or choice of friends. We’re all still Miami Hurricanes. We all attend the best school in Florida. We should put our prejudices and excuses aside and work toward bettering our already fantastic alma mater.

 

Alexa Pappas is a junior majoring in journalism.

January 15, 2014

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Alexa Pappas


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