Opinion

LinkedIn links to opportunities

My friends always tell me to create an Instagram, Twitter and Snapchat. At least I didn’t have to make a LinkedIn account, too.

I thought the correct order for using LinkedIn was 1) get a job and 2) make a LinkedIn profile listing that job under “current employment.” Recently, however, I have learned that a LinkedIn account helps you land the job in the first place.

LinkedIn has turned itself into the modern business card and resume, making it easier than ever for job candidates to network with both colleagues and potential employers at no cost at all. But just because LinkedIn accounts are associated with words like “professional” and “employment,” that doesn’t mean that you shouldn’t make one as an undergraduate.

Creating an account as early as possible is key to having the best network of connections. An early start also allows you to request recommendations from previous bosses and professors right after you interact with them. And the earlier you create a profile, the earlier you can start updating it with activities, research, awards, community service and work experience as you gain them.

Because of all the information available online, employers tend to search the names of candidates they interview. Establishing a professional online presence is crucial. You want to be sure that if someone searches your name, the first thing that pops up is your LinkedIn profile.

In a way, it can be more effective than a paper resume, because it matches a face to all the qualifications, and potential employers can feel like they know you. I’ve even heard stories of college students being sought out by employers for positions they never even applied to simply because the employer stumbled upon his or her LinkedIn profile.

If you’re not in a class that requires you to create a profile, winter break is the time to start. If you already have one, don’t let it be stagnant: You have to continue to update it. If you’re a regular LinkedIn user, I can’t say you’re ahead of the game (because of how fast technology moves), but at least you’re keeping up with it.

 

Nayna Shah is a freshman majoring in music composition.

December 5, 2013

Reporters

Nayna Shah


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

Either the Miami Hurricanes get a collective adrenaline rush from heart-palpitating fourth quarters, ...

Mark Richt is not overly concerned with depth. Not when the eighth-ranked Miami Hurricanes (6-0, 4-0 ...

After jumping three spots from No. 10 to No. 7 last week in the Amway Coaches Poll (one spot better ...

University of Miami weak-side linebacker Michael Pinckney is definitely old-school Miami Hurricane. ...

The question came straight at Ahmmon Richards, like a tight spiral. And this time, he was locked in. ...

Univeristy of Miami’s Wynwood Art Gallery holds its annual faculty exhibition featuring thought-prov ...

From a game simulating how whales navigate to a tribute to Ella Fitzgerald, the U showcased some of ...

A new mobile game called Blues and Reds, now available worldwide, aims to help researchers study int ...

A major Lancet Commission report, a three-year project headed by UM’s Professor Felicia Knaul and co ...

With a $6.8 million NIH grant, the UM School of Nursing and Health Studies and FIU Robert Stempel Co ...

The Hurricanes grabbed four interceptions and another ACC victory as they defeated Syracuse, 27-19, ...

The Miami women's tennis team wrapped up play Sunday the ITA Southeast Regional Championships P ...

As a Hurricane Club member, you are invited to participate in the 25th Annual University of Miami Ha ...

Kolby Bird had a career-high 21 kills, but the Hurricanes dropped a five-set battle to Notre Dame on ...

The Miami soccer team recognized its four seniors Sunday afternoon and then dropped a hard-fought 2- ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.