Edge, Music, Reviews

Short set leaves something to be desired of Sleigh Bells

One thing rock shows have over EDM shows is connecting with their audience during their sets. Vocalist Alexis Krauss and guitarist Derek Miller make up the Brooklyn rock duo Sleigh Bells. Heavy guitar riffs from Miller, loud screaming and crowd surfing from Krauss rocked the Culture Room Saturday, as they made a stop on their Bitter Rivals fall tour.

Lights and fog covered the stage once Krauss walked on stage at 10:15 p.m. in her leopard print satin boxing robe which had, “ALEXIS KRAUSS” and her initials, “AK” in a gothic type printed on the back.

Krauss further verified that she is a sexy, porcelain-skin, tattooed, head-banging goddess, which made all the boys and girls drool and fog up their thick-framed glasses. With a stage presence that’s greater than her beauty, Krauss was having an awesome time performing and constantly moving her long black straight hair.

Their too-cool-for-school demeanor exults them, not in an over-the-top pretentious way, but in a manner that makes you fangirl and possibly crowd surf at their shows sort of way.

Unlike most bands, Sleigh Bells didn’t concentrate their entire set solely on their recently release album “Bitter Rivals.” They played classic hits from their first album that got them on the map like “Crown on the Ground,” “Riot Rhythm ” and “Infinity Guitars;” they played “Comeback Kid,” “Born to Lose” and “Demons” from their sophomore album; and they played “Bitter Rivals,” “You Don’t Get Me Twice” and others from their recent album.

During “Bitter Rivals” and “Comeback Kid” Krauss faced her microphone to the audience, which caused many fans to scream the lyrics and push and shove each other to get as close to Krauss as possible.

The set was a tremendous amount of fun. Everyone was constantly moving their head and feet, and some even crowd surfed to get a high five from Krauss.

The only negative thing about the set was that it ended at 11:15 p.m., lasting only an hour. Though incredible, it left many hipsters craving for a much longer set from the two. Fans even stayed 20 minutes after their encore because they thought it was a joke. Regardless, fans still left the show with a “show high,” the euphoric feeling you get after seeing a good band live.

However, South Florida fans still want more Sleigh Bells.

November 4, 2013

Reporters

Frank Malvar


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