Opinion

Fame carries subjective meaning

In the words of our favorite famous monster, and not the one that eats cookies, Lady Gaga is “doin’ it for the fame.”

After listening to this song an appropriate number of times, I think I finally understand its purpose – she does it for the fame. However, what really makes someone famous, recognized or truly successful? An individual isn’t simply famous or not. Fame is a relative and subjective concept.

It seems like Lady Gaga is famous, right? But a 60-year-old could meet the Fame Monster and unknowingly offer the 27-year-old a batch of fresh baked chocolate chip cookies like she would to the rest of her grandchildren.

What about President Donna E. Shalala? She is an esteemed figure on campus who inspires awe in students and faculty with her many accolades and prestigious position. But, if a random individual were to bump into her in the ice cream section of a grocery store in her hometown of Cleveland, would this person feel any different toward her than anyone else? Does her twin sister think of her as President Shalala, or former secretary of health and human services?

Who an individual considers famous is based on a number of factors including his or her personality, interests, self-awareness, age and social environment. One person may become star-struck, while others may act normally around this “famous” individual.

People are just that – human. As students, we should not strive toward fame or recognition, but rather explore our talents and skills to ultimately find careers that fulfill us. If you become the next Mark Zuckerberg simply because you followed your dreams and passions, then more power to you.

 

Alyssa Jacobson is a junior majoring in advertising and political science.

October 4, 2013

Reporters

Alyssa Jacobson


Around the Web
  • Miami Herald
  • UM News
  • HurricaneSports

One day after the University of Miami announced that starting cornerback Malek Young would undergo “ ...

It’s one thing for a player who’s projected to go in the first two rounds of the NFL Draft to turn p ...

Miami coach Jim Larranaga and his staff spent recent practices pushing his players to whip the ball ...

The University of Miami confirmed in a written release Sunday that starting cornerback Malek Young s ...

In 2016, the Miami Hurricanes had tight end David Njoku, who went in the first round of the 2017 NFL ...

Presidents at three higher education institutions in Miami "lend our unified voices” to the cal ...

Thirty high school English teachers from Brazil are spending six weeks at UM in a new skill-building ...

Global and local efforts needed to respond to biological threats, UM President Julio Frenk warned at ...

As artificial Intelligence takes hold, tech visionary David Kenny stresses keeping human values in t ...

UM’s First Black Graduates Project committee visits an iconic D.C. museum for inspiration to create ...

The No. 25/23 Miami men's basketball team shot a sizzling 57.6 percent from the field in pullin ...

The University of Miami women's basketball team picked up its third straight win in eight days ...

The University of Miami men's tennis team (1-2) closed out its opening weekend with a 5-2 loss ...

With the help of dominating victories and dramatic comebacks, the No. 19 Miami women's tennis t ...

The University of Miami men's tennis team (1-1) returns to action on Sunday, as it travels to N ...

TMH Twitter Feed
About TMH

The Miami Hurricane is the student newspaper of the University of Miami in Coral Gables, Fla. The newspaper is edited and produced by undergraduate students at UM and is published weekly in print on Tuesdays during the regular academic year.