Opinion

iOS 7 becomes apple of users’ eyes

MUG_111

Nayna Shah

If you still haven’t updated your iPhone to iOS 7, you probably either don’t have space (time to delete your hundreds of selfies) or you’re in iOS 7 denial.

I, too, was unwilling to let go of the world of iOS 6 and plunge into the flashy unknown of the iOS 7 interface. Finally hitting that update button, though, was the best decision I could have made.

Aside from the obvious changes, like the new control center, camera filters, iTunes Radio and multitasking windows, I am most impressed by the less noticeable features.

To start, Apple has fixed many universal pet peeves. For example, time stamps for each individual text message can now be seen with a quick swipe to the left. Folders also no longer have a limit on how many apps can be put inside each, meaning neurotic app organizers can file apps to their hearts’ content. Finally, photos can be organized by date or location depending on your preference, making the transfer of pictures to iPhoto much smoother.

On top of that, our pal Siri has gotten much smarter. She can now search through your Twitter feed and improve her pronunciation of words when you teach her the correct pronunciations. Better yet, she can remind you of something once you return home, if your address is programmed into the phone.

Another clever improvement is that the Safari app now has an extra folder that includes links recently posted on your Twitter feed. This way, when you open the Twitter folder on Safari, an entire list shows up with  links of interesting, relevant articles recommended by your friends.

One of Apple’s smartest ideas is including the option to revert back to certain iOS 6 settings. For example, apps on the screen tend to float and shift depending the phone’s tilt, but if you’re prone to motion sickness, you can switch this off. You can also turn off the new setting that automatically updates your apps for you. And for fans of the classic marimba ringtone, don’t fret. You can still access your old ringtones in the sounds settings.

Whether you make the switch for the wannabe-hipster camera filters, the newly accented Siri or the pretty colors, you’ll discover dozens of improvements over iOS 6. It isn’t too late to jump on the update bandwagon. Just hit the magical update button and save yourself much iFrustration.

 

Nayna Shah is a freshman majoring in music composition.

 
September 22, 2013

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Nayna Shah


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